Advertisement
  1. Archive

PROPOSED NATIONAL SECURITY BILL

Highlights of the House Republican bill addressing the Sept. 11 commission's recommendations on national security, intelligence and terrorism:

+ Forces confirmation of the president's nominee to be intelligence director by the Senate in 30 days or the nominee would be automatically confirmed.

+ Automatically makes the person serving as CIA director on the day the president signs the bill the national intelligence director.

+ Sets up a national counterterrorism center to coordinate antiterror efforts and a joint intelligence community council made up of the secretaries of state, treasury, homeland security, energy and defense, as well as the attorney general, to advise the national intelligence director.

+ Allows law officers investigating suspected spies or terrorists to wiretap foreigners even if they cannot be linked to a government or terror group.

+ Requires fines and jail time for military or terror hoaxes.

+ Prescribes jail time and fines for people who receive military-style training from terror groups or provide material or financial support for terrorists or terrorist groups.

+ Expands the ban and penalties on using or participation in the use of chemical and nuclear weapons, including coverage of the U.S. mail system.

+ Allows the Treasury Department to produce currency, postage stamps and other security documents for foreign governments.

+ Allows the attorney general to set up a system for employers to check Justice Department information on prospective employees.

+ Requires the Homeland Security Department to start testing a next-generation airline passenger prescreening system to match passenger name records to the automatic no-fly lists and to set up a system to allow people to appeal their placement on those lists.

+ Requires the Homeland Security Department to give priority to developing, testing, improving and deploying technology at screening checkpoints at airports that would detect nonmetallic weapons and explosives being transported by individuals.

Associated Press

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Advertisement
Advertisement