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OBITUARIES

Bernie Boston, a newspaper photographer best known for his iconic 1960s picture of a Vietnam War protester placing flowers in soldiers' gun barrels at a rally, died Tuesday (Jan. 22, 2008) at home in Virginia of a rare blood disease. He was 74. Mr. Boston retired in 1994 after working for the Los Angeles Times, Washington Star and Dayton Daily News. "Flower Power," taken during a war protest in Washington in 1967, was a runnerup for the Pulitzer Prize. Mr. Boston was also a Pulitzer finalist for a 1987 photograph of Coretta Scott King unveiling a bust of her late husband, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

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Miles Lerman, who fought against the Nazis in Poland and later helped found the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, died Tuesday (Jan. 22, 2008) at home in Philadelphia. He was 88. "Our job was to raise havoc, to raise hell with them and survive," he once told the Philadelphia Inquirer of the nearly two years he spent fighting the Nazis after escaping a slave labor camp. Mr. Lerman and his wife immigrated to New York City in 1947. He was involved in the Holocaust Museum from the planning stages and was the board's chairman emeritus.

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Marie Smith Jones, the last full-blooded Eyak and fluent speaker of her native language, died Monday (Jan. 21, 2008) at home in Alaska. She was 89. Her death brings into extinction Eyak, a branch of the Athabaskan Indian family of languages, said Michael Krauss, a linguist at the University of Alaska at Fairbanks. Ms. Jones was honorary chief of the Eyak Nation. By the 21st century, only about 50 Eyaks remained, according to the Alaska Native Language Center, which Krauss directs.

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Rudolph R. Spruengli, heir to a Swiss chocolate empire and head of the world-renowned Lindt & Spruengli business for more than two decades, died Monday (Jan. 21, 2008). He was 88. Mr. Spruengli spent his entire working life with the Lindt & Spruengli chocolate dynasty, known worldwide for its luxury chocolates. "The firm is more important than the family," he once declared.

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Mildred Callahan Jones, a Virginia woman whose "It's a Boy" flag hanging outside her home in 1975 drew national attention and helped launch the decorative flag industry, died Jan. 17, 2008, after a long illness. She was 64. Her baby-arrival banners were sold in stores, but Ms. Jones' specialty was one-of-a-kind stitched nylon flags. Her clients included President Ronald Reagan.

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