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LAWMAKERS ASK CLINTON ABOUT AIDE'S EXIT

ALBANY, N.Y.

Two Hispanic New York lawmakers said they would be upset if Hillary Rodham Clinton's Hispanic campaign manager was replaced because of primary losses they believe should be blamed on former President Bill Clinton and others. Patti Solis Doyle, whose parents were Mexican immigrants, stepped down as Clinton's campaign manager Sunday as Clinton was losing five Democratic weekend contests to Barack Obama. Clinton has said Solis Doyle's decision was a personal response to a grueling campaign, not about job performance. In a letter to Clinton dated Monday, two New York City Democrats, state Sen. Ruben Diaz Jr. and Assembly member Jose Peralta, wrote that they are inclined to believe the explanation, but "it will be very troubling to many if somehow we later find that she left her post under pressure because of the recent primary losses." Solis Doyle responded: "This my decision, my choice, my timing."

EL PASO, Texas

Clinton campaign's deputy moves on

Hillary Rodham Clinton's deputy campaign manager resigned Tuesday, the latest departure in a staff shakeup after a string of losses to Barack Obama. In an e-mail message to staffers, Mike Henry said he was stepping down to allow campaign manager Maggie Williams to build her own staff. Williams replaced Patti Solis Doyle on Sunday.

WASHINGTON

Bush fundraiser to join McCain

Sen. John McCain began tapping into President Bush's prized political donor base on Tuesday as his campaign announced that Mercer Reynolds, who helped Bush raise a record $273-million for the 2004 re-election campaign, would be the national finance co-chairman. The development was a sign that the GOP financial establishment was coalescing around McCain, who has often been at odds with his party, particularly conservatives. Reynolds is a wealthy Cincinnati executive and a former ambassador to Switzerland.

HARRISBURG, Pa.

Governor says race may be vote issue

Gov. Ed Rendell, one of Hillary Rodham Clinton's most visible supporters, said some white Pennsylvanians are likely to vote against her rival Barack Obama because he is black. "You've got conservative whites here, and I think there are some whites who are probably not ready to vote for an African-American candidate," he told the editorial board of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette in remarks published Tuesday. The state's primary is April 22.

Elsewhere

Washington: In a letter to the Democratic National Committee, NAACP chairman Julian Bond said refusing to seat delegates from Florida and Michigan would disenfranchise both states' minority communities.

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