Advertisement
  1. Archive

ODD IS BEST IN CELLULOID DOLLS

Twentieth century iron toys and tin toys have been collected and researched for generations. But celluloid toys, which date from the late 1800s to the 1950s (when plastic became popular), were made in many European countries, Japan and the United States. Although celluloid is flammable and dents, cracks and splits easily, it was used to make dolls and other toys because it was inexpensive and could be decorated with bright colors and molded into complicated shapes. One of the most popular celluloid toys in the United States was the "Boopie," also called a "carnival doll." She had a pot-belly, large, round eyes and wavy hair, looked a little like a Kewpie and a little like Betty Boop. The dolls, made in Japan, sold for a few cents each, and often were given as prizes at amusement parks and fairs. Today, a doll can sell for $10 to $50. Collectors prefer rare, odd-looking dolls that look like cartoon characters, exotic animals or Santa. In good condition, they sell for $100 or more.

* * *

Hampshire Pottery

Q: I have a matte-green pitcher with an impressed mark that says "J.S.T. & Co., Keene, N.H." Who is the maker?

A: The mark on your pitcher is among those used by Hampshire Pottery. The pottery was founded in Keene, N.H., by James Scollay Taft in 1871. Pieces are marked with a printed or impressed mark that includes the founder's initials or the name "Hampshire Pottery." In 1916, Taft sold the pottery to George Morton, who had worked at Grueby Pottery in Boston. Hampshire Pottery closed in 1917, reopened a couple of years later and closed permanently in 1923.

* * *

Joseph Peters Furniture Co.

Q: I have a chifforobe made by the Joseph Peters Furniture Co. of St. Louis. What can you tell me about this company?

A: Joseph Peters, an immigrant from Prussia, founded his furniture company in St. Louis in 1855. At first he specialized in making bureaus and cabinets, but the business thrived, and by 1908 the company was operating 50 factories and employed more than 7,000 people. It remained in business at least into the 1930s.

* * *

Peter Coddle games

Q: Does anyone remember the game Peter Coddles Goes to Town? It was a printed story with spaces for new words or phrases to finish a sentence. A player would read the story, and players would add words or phrases from their individual cards. The random sentence combinations were hilarious, and it was a great reading experience for kids.

A: Peter Coddle is based on a "literary puzzle" game in the book Jessie; Or, Trying to Be Somebody, published by Gould & Lincoln in 1858. In the story, Peter was supposed to be an 18-year-old, but he usually is pictured on game boxes as an older country bumpkin visiting a big city. Several different Peter Coddle games were made in the late 1800s until at least the 1930s. One of the most popular is Peter Coddle's Trip to New York, which was made in various versions by, among others, Parker Brothers in 1888 and Milton Bradley in 1925. Most are "fill-in-the-blank" card games like yours, but there also is a board-game version. The title may spell Peter's last name "Coddle" or "Coddles." Occasionally these games show up on the Internet or in a group of games at an auction. Value depends on age, condition and box cover. Most games sell for less than $100. Newer versions sell for $25-$50.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Advertisement
Advertisement