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TENNIS CHAMPION JACK KRAMER, 88, DIES OF CANCER

MAKING NEWS

Jack Kramer, a tennis champion in the 1940s and '50s and a promoter of the sport for more 60 years, died Saturday at his home in Los Angeles, his family said. He was 88. Mr. Kramer, above at Wimbledon in 1947, was diagnosed with cancer in July, according to his son Bob Kramer. Mr. Kramer, who briefly attended Rollins College, won the Wimbledon men's singles title in 1947 and the men's U.S. Championships, the forerunner of the U.S. Open, in 1946 and '47. He won seven Grand Slam doubles titles, and was No. 1 in the world for much of the late 1940s. He retired in 1954, due to an arthritic back. His wife, Gloria, died in 2008. Along with Bob, he is survived by four other sons, David, John, Michael and Ron, and by eight grandchildren.

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OUT OF BOUNDS

Nice job: Play a little, wear ring

In a round-table discussion with NFL quarterbacks Ben Roethlisberger, Aaron Rodgers, Carson Palmer, Matt Ryan and Tony Romo, Sports Illustrated's Peter King asked them what an ideal job would be. "I'm going to go with Luke Walton's job," Ryan said of the Lakers forward, above. "Play eight minutes a game, win an NBA ring. He's got it going on."

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Yep, that Jeter sure is a big bust

Derek Jeter's high school coach Don Zomer told New York's Daily News about a conversation with the Yankees' new all-time hits leader 17 years ago when Jeter was struggling in the minor leagues. Said Zomer: "I remember him saying, 'The Yankees wasted a lot of their money.'"

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QUOTABLE

"The thing I feel bad is, the tirade she went on, you have someone trying to do their job. It's not a fair fight."

Joe Torre, Dodgers manager, weighing in on Serena Williams's behavior toward a line judge at the U.S. Open

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