Advertisement
  1. Archive

BURT CHECKS INTO REHAB

Burt Reynolds has checked himself into a West Palm Beach rehab facility for an addiction to painkillers, the Associated Press reports. "After a recent back surgery, Mr. Reynolds felt like he was going through hell and, after a while, realized he was a prisoner of prescription pain pills. He checked himself into rehab in order to regain control of his life," rep Erik Kritzer said in a statement. This is after the 73-year-old was found in a pool of blood by an employee at his home, the National Enquirer reported, and when does it ever lie? It also said he was in rehab for booze, too. "Mr. Reynolds hopes his story will help others in a similar situation," Kritzer said. "He hopes they will not try to solve the problem by themselves, but realize that sometimes it is too tough to do on their own, and they should seek help, as he did."

* * *

Spinal Tap is on iTunes

Spinal Tap's Nigel Tufnel, David St. Hubbins and Derek Smalls are back in a new short film available only on iTunes: Stonehenge: 'Tis a Magic Place, which is strange because anyone who would still watch yet another Spinal Tap product is too old to be using iTunes. The seven-minute film follows the fictional band on its first visit to the historic monument. "The silent song of these mysterious lithic Sirens inspires the distinguished artistes to make a trans-generational house-call," says a press release on Spinal Tap's official Web site. The Stonehenge movie is $1.99 on iTunes. The original 1984 movie This is Spinal Tap is also on iTunes for $9.99 ($19.99 for the high-def version). A DVD release of the recent concert tour -Unwigged & Unplugged: An Evening with Christopher Guest, Michael McKean and Harry Shearer - is also expected this month, but to the chagrin of older fans, there will be no VHS release.

* * *

Henry Gibson dies at 73

Henry Gibson, the veteran character actor who came to fame in the late 1960s as the flower-holding poet on TV's landmark satirical comedy show Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In, has died. He was 73. Gibson died Monday night at his home in Malibu, Calif., after a short battle with cancer, his son Jon said. Gibson, who more recently had a recurring role as a judge on Boston Legal, was part of the original cast of Laugh-In, which ran on NBC from 1968 to 1973.

* * *

Folk singer Mary Travers dies

Mary Travers, one-third of the hugely popular 1960s folk trio Peter, Paul and Mary, has died. The band's publicist, Heather Lylis, said Travers died at Danbury Hospital in Connecticut on Wednesday. She was 72 and had battled leukemia for several years. Travers,Peter Yarrow and Noel Paul Stookey teamed up in the early 1960s. The trio mingled their music with liberal politics, both on stage and off. Their version of If I Had a Hammer became an anthem for racial equality. They were early champions of Bob Dylan and performed his Blowin' in the Wind at the August 1963 March on Washington. The group collected five Grammy Awards for its three-part harmony on enduring songs such as Leaving on a Jet Plane, Puff (The Magic Dragon) and Blowin' in the Wind.

jgillin@tampabay.com

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Advertisement
Advertisement