Advertisement
  1. Archive

HEROES OF THE HUDSON TOGETHER AGAIN

The pilots who landed a US Airways jet safely in the Hudson River will reunite in the cockpit today for the first time for a flight out of New York, the airline said. Capt. Chesley "Sully" Sullenberger and 1st Officer Jeffrey Skiles will pilot a flight from LaGuardia Airport to Charlotte, N.C. - the destination of the plane they ditched in the Hudson on Jan. 15, saving the lives of all 155 people on board. Today's flight will be Sullenberger's first as a US Airways captain since the Miracle on the Hudson flight. US Airways announced Monday that Sullenberger would be making regular flights and supervising other pilots as part of the airline's safety management team. Skiles has been back flying with US Airways since April. Sullenberger landed the Airbus A320 in the Hudson after a collision with a flock of geese killed power in both engines minutes after takeoff from LaGuardia. His book, Highest Duty: My Search for What Really Matters, is due out next month. Sullenberger and Skiles won praise for their textbook response to the loss of power. Their plane was at just 2,800 feet, giving them 31/2 minutes to try to restart the engines or find an airport for a landing. Sullenberger told the National Transportation Safety Board in June that he glided into the Hudson near Manhattan's ferry terminals to increase the chances of a rescue.

* * *

Candy could lead to ... prison?

Children who eat too much candy may be more likely to be arrested for violent behavior as adults, new research suggests. British experts studied more than 17,000 children born in 1970 for about four decades. Of the children who ate candies or chocolates daily at age 10, 69 percent were later arrested for a violent offense by the age of 34. Of those who didn't have any violent clashes, 42 percent ate sweets daily. The study was published in the October issue of the British Journal of Psychiatry. It was paid for by Britain's Economic and Social Research Council. The researchers said the results were interesting, but that more studies were needed to confirm the link. "It's not fair to blame it on the candy," said Simon Moore of the University of Cardiff, one of the paper's authors. "It's more about interpreting how kids make decisions." Moore said parents who consistently bribe their children with candies and chocolates could be preventing kids from learning how to defer gratification, leading to impulsive behavior and violence.

* * *

New stamps go deep

A set of stamps depicting plants and animals that live in the ocean's kelp forest will be released today in underwater ceremonies in the kelp forest display at the Monterey Bay Aquarium in California. The stamps feature the brown pelican, Monterey turban snail, brooding sea anemone, treefish, western gull, southern sea otter, red sea urchin, harbor seal, lion's mane nudibranch, Pacific rock crab, jeweled top snail and many other creatures.

* * *

Most of bird-fight ring uncaged

A Connecticut judge has granted probation to 18 of 19 men arrested in connection with a bird-fighting operation. The accelerated rehabilitation means charges of cruelty to animals and illegal gambling will be dropped if they stay out of trouble for one year. The natives of Brazil were arrested in a July 26 raid west of New Haven. About 150 birds were seized, mostly saffron finches and canaries. The birds are now at several animal sanctuaries.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Advertisement
Advertisement