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FIERY PORK SKEWERS

Pat Bernitt of Lutz shares a favorite recipe that she found at www.allrecipes.com, a go-to Internet site for many home cooks. I like Fiery Pork Skewers because it doesn't make a ton of food, which is perfect for solo diners or couples. - It's also nice enough to serve to guests. It can be easily doubled if you need more. - Pat didn't suggest what to serve with the skewers, but I'd go for rice (white or brown) or maybe couscous. Slice some fresh scallions to mix in.

Note: Today's recipe is just one example of the recipes you can get by e-mail every weekday afternoon. Sign up for Easy Meal Ideas From Janet's Kitchen, and you'll have recipes and kitchen tips delivered to your in-box. Go to enews.tampabay. com.

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Easy

Fiery Pork Skewers

2 tablespoons teriyaki sauce

1 tablespoon red wine vinegar

1 tablespoon vegetable oil

1 teaspoon brown sugar

1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes

3/4 pound pork tenderloin, cut into 1-inch cubes

In a medium bowl, mix teriyaki sauce, red wine vinegar, vegetable oil, brown sugar and red pepper flakes. Place pork tenderloin cubes in the mixture. Toss to coat.

Preheat an outdoor grill for high heat and lightly oil grate.

Place pork on skewers. Cook on the prepared grill, turning and brushing with the teriyaki sauce mixture frequently. Cook 10 to 12 minutes, or to desired doneness.

Makes 4 skewers.

Nutritional information per skewer: 147 calories, 6.5g fat, 3g carbohydrates, no fiber, 18g protein and 390mg sodium.

Source: Allrecipes.com

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Tips from Janet's kitchen

-If you don't want to deal with fish skin, ask the person at the fish counter (even if it's the meat cutter!) to trim it off for you. That way, you'll get a nice-looking piece of fish rather than a ragged one if you do it yourself. Unless, of course, you're a knife master.

-I've said it before, but I'll remind you again for the new year. Don't let fresh herbs, or even scallions, get limp and mushy in the fridge after you've used them for that one recipe. Snip them into scrambled eggs, salads and soups. Watch out for woody rosemary, though, which might overpower dishes more than you'd like.

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