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STRIKES, PROTESTS RATTLE SPAIN, ITALY

Demonstrators rail against benefit cuts and high jobless rates.

Associated Press

BRUSSELS - Hundreds of thousands of Europe's beleaguered citizens went on strike or snarled the streets of several capitals Wednesday, at times clashing with riot police, as they demanded that governments stop cutting benefits and create more jobs.

Workers - those with jobs and those without - spoke of a "social emergency" crippling the world's largest economic bloc, a union of 27 nations and half a billion people. In Madrid and Barcelona, where the crisis is hitting particularly hard, Spanish protesters and police fought street battles. Dozens were injured, and there were numerous arrests.

The protests were met with tear gas in Italy and Spain but were largely limited to the countries hardest hit by the austerity measures designed to bring government spending into line with revenues. Wealthier nations such as Germany, the Netherlands and Denmark saw only small, sedate demonstrations.

Governments backing the line of stringent austerity were not impressed by the show of force.

''We must nevertheless do what is necessary: Break open encrusted labor markets, give more people a chance to work, (and) become more flexible in many areas," German Chancellor Angela Merkel said. ''We will, of course, make this clear, again and again, in talks with the unions."

Spanish Economy Minister Luis de Guindos spoke of "a long crisis that has meant sacrifice and uncertainty," but said, "The government is convinced that the path we have taken is the only possible way out."

To combat a three-year financial crisis over too much sovereign debt, governments across Europe have had to raise taxes and cut spending, pensions and benefits. In addition to hitting workers' incomes and living standards, these measures have led to a decline in economic output and a sharp increase in unemployment.

The zone of the 17 countries that use the euro currency is expected to fall into recession when official figures are released today. Unemployment across those countries has reached a record 11.6 percent, with Spain and Greece seeing levels above 25 percent.

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