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FERNS POPULAR IN 19TH CENTURY

Most people have heard about the bout of "Tulipmania" that spread through the Netherlands in the 17th century, but few know about "Pteridomania," or fern madness. In the 19th century, ferns were part of a popular health regimen. People would go into the woods to hunt for ferns or to study nature. It was good exercise for body and soul. People from all levels of society joined in searching for new varieties of ferns they could record, plant or dry and put in albums. The many varieties of ferns were soon featured on porcelains and iron garden furniture, and in paintings and interior decors. Green majolica plates shaped like fern leaves, iron benches by Coalbrookdale and children's toy porcelain dishes by Ridgways were decorated with ferns. The madness continued into the 1880s, but even today ferns are popular house and garden plants. More than 10 varieties are offered in new mail-order garden catalogs, and even more can be found in nurseries in cities with a fern-friendly climate. It would be easy to find decorative examples of Pteridomania and form a collection today.

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Historic newspapers have value

Q: I'm 92 years old and am trying to get rid of some old possessions. A copy of the April 20, 1865, Philadelphia Inquirer has been in my family for ages. The front page has several articles about President Abraham Lincoln's funeral. There are drawings (not photographs) of the funeral car and coffin. I'd like to sell it but don't know the value. Can you help?

A: Newspapers covering the death of President Lincoln are collectible. The value of old newspapers varies, depending on the importance of the historical event covered as well as condition and rarity.

A front-page article with graphic art is more important than articles on inside pages or those without pictures. Before photography was commonly used, illustrations were made from woodcuts. Some newspapers that are old but don't cover significant events sell for under $10, while newer papers covering important events can sell for hundreds of dollars.

Old newspapers become yellow and crumble if not stored properly, but newspapers printed on paper made from rag linen, common before 1876, don't deteriorate as quickly as those made on modern paper. Newspapers should be stored flat and away from light, heat and moisture.

Don't store them in the attic or basement. Newspapers with stories about Lincoln have sold in recent years for $10 to a few hundred dollars, depending on condition and content.

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