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Cheddar chive buttermilk biscuits make for a quick dinner side

They’d be a great addition to your Thanksgiving meal.
Chive and Cheddar Buttermilk Drop Biscuits [LORRAINE FINA STEVENSKI | Special to the Times]
Published Nov. 13

Here is an easy version of a buttermilk biscuit: no rolling, no kneading. Just scoop with a two-tablespoon cookie scoop and drop onto a cookie sheet. Brush with melted butter, and you have a perfect biscuit.

Serve with a hearty meal of stew or soup to complement the chives and cheese. Or drizzle honey over them for a sweet-savory combination that works deliciously.

Chive and Cheddar Buttermilk Drop Biscuits

Chive and Cheddar Buttermilk Drop Biscuits [LORRAINE FINA STEVENSKI | Special to the Times]

2 ¼ cups all-purpose flour

1 tablespoon baking powder

¼ teaspoon baking soda

2 teaspoons kosher salt

1 teaspoon garlic-pepper blend

¾ cup unsalted butter (1 ½ sticks), cold, cut into 1-inch cubes

1 cup whole buttermilk

¾ cup shredded sharp cheddar cheese

¼ cup coarsely minced fresh chives

2 tablespoons melted unsalted butter

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Line a rimmed half sheet pan with parchment paper. Arrange the oven rack to the lowest rack.

In a large mixing bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt and garlic-pepper blend. With a pastry blender or your fingers, blend in the cold butter until the mixture is crumbly.

Gradually add the buttermilk, stirring with a stiff rubber spatula, just until a soft dough forms and holds together. This dough will be very moist and not as dry as a regular biscuit dough. Stir in the cheddar cheese and chives and mix just until all the flour is incorporated.

With a two-tablespoon cookie scoop, drop the biscuits onto the pan evenly spaced three to a row. Gently brush the tops with melted butter. Bake until golden brown and nicely risen, 12 to 15 minutes. Let cool on the pan for 5 minutes. Serve warm.

Makes 12 big biscuits.

Source: Lorraine Fina Stevenski

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