Advertisement
Paul Guzzo - General Assignment/Vintage Tampa Bay Reporter

General Assignment/Vintage Tampa Bay Reporter

I am a general assignment reporter with specific and varying niches – the local film industry, U.S.-Cuba relations, Tampa history, professional wrestling and the odd and unique people who make up this area. I have been a journalist in Tampa since 1999. In my younger years, I was also an independent filmmaker best known for an award-winning documentary on Charlie Wall, Tampa’s first crime lord. At home, I am married to a woman who is way out of my league and a father of four kids who have diverse career goals – engineer, veterinarian, ballerina, and a “fighting ninja.” As opposed to a pacifist ninja.

  1. Old Augusta bricks pave the road on West Bay Street in the Spanishtown Creek section of Hyde Park.
    The neighborhood association wants the city to promise via an ordinance to not remove their community’s historic street bricks.
  2. The owner of Tampa's last operating segregation-era African-American cemetery has died and his family no longer wants to run it.  Memorial Park Cemetery is a segregation era all-black cemetery.
    Some 6,000 people were laid to rest at the African-American cemetery, but no one wants to take care of it anymore.
  3. Volunteers struggle to keep branches and debris away from the graves at the African-American Spring Hill Cemetery.
    The aging burial grounds have many challenges in common, including ownership issues, restoration and maintenance.
  4. Ronald Sheehy of St. Petersburg knew about his uncle, Samuel Oscar Sheehy, a well known "fixer" in Tampa's minority communities of the early 1900s. But he didn't know his uncle had a son who died at 18 months and was buried in the long-forgotten Zion Cemetery.
    Some of Tampa’s most prominent African-American families buried their dead at Zion. Still, apartments and businesses were built on top of them.
  5. The Kennedy family plot is among the most elaborate at historic Oaklawn Cemetery in downtown Tampa. Henry P. Kennedy, who is buried at the site, was the last recorded owner of Zion Cemetery, a segregation-era burial ground for African-Americans that disappeared from view.
    The discovery of caskets under a public housing project raises questions about how it happened: ‘They did something wrong and need be charged publicly.’
  6. This image is a 3D laser scan of Robles Park Village showing grave-shaped objects beneath the ground in relation to buildings at the public housing complex. The single image is made from two data sources and aligns with historical maps of the former Zion Cemetery.
    Leaving bodies in place at the forgotten Africa-American burial ground may not be a decision for the Housing Authority to make, Cruz said.
  7. Pastor Byron Pressley of First Mt. Carmel AME Church says prayers Friday afternoon for the people buried and forgotten at Zion Cemetery, now the site of Tampa's Robles Park Village apartment complex. A ground-penetrating radar survey has revealed 126 caskets there with more of the cemetery property still to be studied.
    To Pastor Pressley, those who are long forgotten remain his parishioners. “They are probably still watching over us."
  8. This image is a 3D laser scan of Robles Park Village showing grave-shaped objects beneath the ground in relation to buildings at the public housing complex. The single image is made from two data sources and aligns with historical maps of the former Zion Cemetery.
    The news brings residents of Robles Park Village to tears. The place where they live was built on the site of long-forgotten Zion Cemetery.
  9. Graham Sowa, shown here with Cuban-born wife Maylin Zaldívar outside Hotel Nacional in Cuba, got his medical degree in Cuba and is serving his residency in Brandon.
    U.S. urges investigation, but Graham Sowa defends the quality of the island nation’s medical schools. He got a degree for free.
  10. Patrons are silhouetted against the entrance to The Hub. The iconic Tampa bar is celebrating its 70th year.
[CHRIS URSO | Times]
    Patrons’ memories of the bar, and a definitive history, remain elusive.