Gradebook podcast: A year after Parkland, Florida debates arming teachers

Views from a Marjory Stoneman Douglas teacher, an activist mom and a state leader in law enforcement.
Mourners bring flowers as they pay tribute at a memorial for the victims of the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School on Sunday, Feb. 25, 2018 during an open house as parents and students returned to the school for the first time since 17 people were killed in a mass shooting at the school in Parkland on Feb. 14, 2018. (David Santiago/Miami Herald/TNS) 1239262
Mourners bring flowers as they pay tribute at a memorial for the victims of the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School on Sunday, Feb. 25, 2018 during an open house as parents and students returned to the school for the first time since 17 people were killed in a mass shooting at the school in Parkland on Feb. 14, 2018. (David Santiago/Miami Herald/TNS) 1239262
Published February 14
Updated February 14

A year after 17 people were murdered by an armed intruder inside Marjory Stoneman Douglas High in Parkland, Fla., a debate rages over whether allowing teachers to carry guns in their classrooms would serve as a useful deterrent to future attacks.

Legislation is moving through the Florida Senate to add teachers to the mix of school “guardians” — something lawmakers didn’t accept when crafting their initial school safety bill just weeks after the incident.

Hear some of the key voices in the debate as we discuss the issue with MSD teacher Sarah Lerner, Moms Demand Action leader Gay Valimont and Pinellas County Sheriff Bob Gualtieri, who heads the state’s Public Safety Commission.

Related coverage: One year after Parkland, Florida lawmakers renew push to arm teachers -- with help from Ron DeSantis

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