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Florida education news: Vouchers, resource officers, principals and more

A roundup of stories from around the state.
 
Hernando County Sheriff's deputy Cory Zarcone, 28, talks to Aleigha Dziedzic, 5, right, during breakfast time in the cafeteria of Brooksville Elementary School on March 7, 2018. Hernando County leaders approved a spending plan to add 10 school resource officers to area schools. ALESSANDRA DA PRA | Times
Hernando County Sheriff's deputy Cory Zarcone, 28, talks to Aleigha Dziedzic, 5, right, during breakfast time in the cafeteria of Brooksville Elementary School on March 7, 2018. Hernando County leaders approved a spending plan to add 10 school resource officers to area schools. ALESSANDRA DA PRA | Times
Published Feb. 28, 2019

VOUCHERS: The chairman of the Senate Education Committee proposes expanding the state’s new voucher-like scholarship program for students who claim to be bullied, despite it being taken this year by just over 100 children. Sen. Manny Diaz says his bill is a “conversation piece” to keep the debate going.

SECURITY: Hernando County’s charter schools have not yet hired armed officers or guards, putting them at odds with state law as the Supreme Court calls for a grand jury to look into schools’ compliance with security mandates. • The Clay County school district hires its first chief of its new police force, the Florida Times-Union reports. • The Florida Chamber of Commerce launches a new school safety institute, Florida Politics reports.

LEADERSHIP: Hernando County’s Eastside Elementary, which has improved from F to A over the past six years, gets a new principal charged with keeping the school on its upward track.

NEW JOB: North Carolina’s deputy superintendent of public instruction will become Florida’s chancellor for education innovation, a new post reporting directly to commissioner Richard Corcoran, NC Policy Watch reports.

CHARTER SCHOOLS: Two charter schools proposed to open in Polk County would focus on dual-language learning, the Ledger reports.

FUNDING: The Florida Education Association plans an advertising campaign to urge lawmakers to better fund public education, WJAX reports. More from Florida Phoenix.

TEACHER PREP: A new NCTQ report suggests Florida’s colleges and universities aren’t doing enough to prepare new teachers, WPTV reports.

TEXTBOOKS: The Volusia County School Board decides to purchase new math books despite a planned state standards review, the Daytona Beach News-Journal reports.

START TIMES: The Orange County school district continues to research whether to start high school classes later in the day, the Orlando Sentinel reports.

HIGHER EDUCATION: Pointing to financial scandals at three universities, two key House lawmakers push for increased legislative oversight of the university system, the News Service of Florida reports.

ON THE RADIO: The Miami-Dade County School Board plots a course for WLRN radio after refusing to let go of its broadcast license, the Miami Herald reports. More from WLRN.

TROUBLED TIMES: A controversial St. Lucie County private school faces eviction from its site, the latest in a string of problems, TC Palm reports.

STUDENT RELATIONSHIPS: A Palm Beach County high school principal plans to ask tougher questions of potential employees after two of his staff are arrested for having sex with students, the Palm Beach Post reports.

DIVIDED BOARD: Lee County School Board members see more signs of division on issues, with meetings growing testy, the Naples Daily News reports.

MEDICAL MARIJUANA: The Palm Beach County school district considers a policy where students could use medical marijuana at school, but school employees could not administer it, the Sun-Sentinel reports.

LABOR NEWS: Hernando County teachers reach a contract deal including 3.5 percent raises. • Miami-Dade College adjunct professors prepare to hold a unionization vote, the Miami Herald reports. • Four Santa Fe College adjunct professors file paperwork to begin the unionization process, WUFT reports.

ON APPEAL: Two recently dismissed Okaloosa County school district administrators try to win their jobs back, the Northwest Florida Daily News reports.

TROUBLING SPEECH: A Leon County high school run by Florida State University is calling for better behavior after a student video using racial slurs goes viral, the Tallahassee Democrat reports.

BAD ACTS: A Manatee County school employee is arrested on accusations he threw a ball in the face of a 5-year-old boy with autism, the Bradenton Herald reports.

ICYMI: Yesterday’s Florida education news roundup