Florida education news: Legislation, teacher pay, vaping and more

A roundup of stories from around the state.
Several dozen protesters interrupted debate in the Florida House on Wednesday. The groups were removed from the House by the Capitol Police "We are protesting various issues like immigrant rights, the passage of the bill with arming teachers, affordable housing, and other issues," said protester Denise Diaz, a 38-year-old mother of two from Orlando. [SCOTT KEELER   |   Times]
Several dozen protesters interrupted debate in the Florida House on Wednesday. The groups were removed from the House by the Capitol Police "We are protesting various issues like immigrant rights, the passage of the bill with arming teachers, affordable housing, and other issues," said protester Denise Diaz, a 38-year-old mother of two from Orlando. [SCOTT KEELER | Times]
Published May 8

VETOES? Gov. Ron DeSantis issues a statement supporting the Florida Legislature’s education legislation, some of which he has already received. Still, thousands of residents call for a veto of the measure allowing teachers to participate in the state’s armed guardian program, Florida Phoenix reports.

TEACHER PAY: The Pasco County School Board approves a teacher contract that offers slight raises, and calls on its administration to look for more money in the coming year. • The Broward County School Board approves retroactive raises for teachers, the Sun-Sentinel reports.

VAPING: The Hernando County school district turns to students to lead the campaign against vaping.

FUNDING: Hillsborough County school district officials say about half of the added $66 million the system will receive from the state is already allocated, and the remainder will be eaten up by rising costs.

TOP TEACHERS: Who will be Florida’s 2019 teacher of the year? The state has begun announcing the finalists, including an educator from Indian River County, TC Palm reports.

REPRIMANDED: Manatee County superintendent Cynthia Saunders receives a reprimand from the Florida Department of Education over her role in inflating district graduation rates, but faces no probation, the Bradenton Herald reports. More from the Herald-Tribune.

SAVE OUR JOBS: Hillsborough County school custodians rally against the idea of outsourcing their work, WMNF reports.

TAXES: The Duval County School Board calls for a sales tax referendum to support school construction, despite opposition from other government leaders who must put the item on the ballot, Florida Politics reports. More from the Florida Times-Union.

SHUTTERING A SCHOOL: The Bay County school district will close another school that suffered significant damage in Hurricane Michael, the Panama City News Herald reports.

SUPERINTENDENT STAYS: The Lee County School Board votes 4-3 to retain superintendent Greg Adkins amid a push to oust him, the Fort Myers News-Press reports.

START TIMES: The Orange County school district revisits the idea of allowing high school students to begin school later in the day, the Orlando Sentinel reports. Leaders have been discussing the issue for four years.

BRANDING: The Broward County school district adds three positions to its communication team in an effort to improve the district’s sagging image, the Sun-Sentinel reports.

DUAL ENROLLMENT: The Sarasota County school district prepares to adopt a new dual enrollment agreement with the University of South Florida that would allow students to take the courses at their high schools, the Herald-Tribune reports.

EASIER ACCESS: The Lake County school district will enhance its website to assist users with disabilities, the Daily Commercial reports.

THE NAME REMAINS: Florida State University loses its bid to remove the name of a former state Supreme Court justice from its law school, the Tallahassee Democrat reports.

BAD ACTS: A Brevard County teacher is arrested on allegations of pulling a student with autism off a bus so had that the student fell on his face, Florida Today reports. • A Manatee County charter school principal could have his certification revoked over his role in recommending a teacher known to be under investigation for sexual misconduct, the Herald-Tribune reports.

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