Advertisement
  1. Gradebook

Who wants changes to Florida’s Common Core standards?

Not too many respondents to the state’s survey see the need.
Donna De Sena, a resource teacher for Hillsborough County, spoke in favor of the Common Core standards during a state-sponsored meeting at Hillsborough Community College in October 2013. A state online survey about the standards indicates teachers largely support the current standards in 2019, as Gov. Ron DeSantis presses for changes. TIMES | 2013
Donna De Sena, a resource teacher for Hillsborough County, spoke in favor of the Common Core standards during a state-sponsored meeting at Hillsborough Community College in October 2013. A state online survey about the standards indicates teachers largely support the current standards in 2019, as Gov. Ron DeSantis presses for changes. TIMES | 2013
Published Jun. 4

In one of his first acts as Florida governor, Ron DeSantis issued an executive order calling for the elimination of the Common Core from the state’s academic standards.

He was making good on a pledge to a portion of the conservative base that helped elect him.

As part of the ongoing effort, which now includes educator experts drafting replacement language, the Department of Education has solicited input from the general public on both the current and draft standards. One of the key questions has been, should each item be replaced, removed or kept unchanged?

One thing stands out in a report of the results through May 28: Regardless of the type of standard, or the role of the respondent, the clear top answer to the question has been, “No change needed.”

That’s true among those listed as parents, who gave that answer 74 percent of the time for language arts standards and 82 percent of the time for math. But it’s even more so among those listed as teachers, who marked that box 84 percent of the time for language arts and 83 percent for math.

Teachers spent years working to incorporate the standards — based largely on the Common Core though renamed Florida Standards to avoid the label — since the state adopted them in 2010. Some have pointed out that the system, intended to help students think more critically, could be time consuming and possibly expensive to replace, particularly with something untried.

The state has set a goal of getting its proposal before the Florida Board of Education for consideration by March 2020.

A review of the drafts so far suggests the educator panels in place have largely offered tweaks to the wording, rather than major changes.

In math, they largely call for clarifying the standards must include “real world scenarios.”

In language arts, they propose adding “content area literacy standards” for science and social studies, but those generally stick to matters such as using textual evidence to support arguments and comparing information from multiple sources. They do not appear to enter the ground of altering the actual content standards for those subjects.

The rewriting continues, as the department surges toward public hearings around the state in the fall.

Keep up with the latest changes and recommendations at https://www.floridastandardsreview.org/.

ALSO IN THIS SECTION

  1. Hillsborough County school superintendent Jeff Eakins, shown at Mort Elementary School in 2016, is retiring effective June 30. [JAMES BORCHUCK   |   Times]
    Jeff Eakins, the current superintendent, is retiring, effective June 30.
  2. Hillsborough county parents can check the district's website for their child's bus route and their school's bus schedule. Visit sdhc.k12.fl.us, click the link under "Preparing for Back to School," then find the links for "Bus Schedule" and "Bus Availability." For more information, call (813) 982-5500. [SKIP O'ROURKE  |   Times]
    Our running list of the candidates to replace superintendent Jeff Eakins includes top educators with a wide range of experience.
  3. Tricia McManus, an assistant superintendent for the Hillsborough County School District, rolled out the district's new Achievement Zone plan for struggling schools at a community meeting in 2018. The word "zone" was removed early on. [MARLENE SOKOL | Times]
    Tricia McManus will become a deputy superintendent in Winston-Salem, North Carolina.
  4. A vigil at Pine Trails Park in Parkland for victims of the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. Credit: Al Diaz, Miami Herald
    A roundup of stories from around the state.
  5. Some schools have already closed for the holidays, but everyone should be off by the end of the day Dec. 20. [Times (2015)]
    Some schools are closing for the holidays this week; others won’t be done for a few days. Then it’s lights out until early January.
  6. This Feb. 19 photo shows a makeshift memorial outside Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, where 17 students and faculty were killed in a mass shooting in Parkland. [AP Photo/Gerald Herbert, File]
    The grand jury said districts are creating “unnecessary chaos” and have become “experts at data manipulation.”
  7. Florida First Lady Casey DeSantis with Hillsborough Superintendent Jeff Eakins and Sheriff Chad Chronister speaking at Hillsborough High School on Thursday, Dec. 12. [MARLENE SOKOL  |  Times staff]
    If students feel supported, educators say, schools will be safer and more productive
  8. Rep. Ben Diamond, D-St. Petersburg, presents his bill on civics education to the House PreK-12 Innovation subcommittee on Dec. 11, 2019. The legislation received unanimous bipartisan support. [The Florida Channel]
    ‘Democracy is not a spectator sport,’ sponsor Rep. Ben Diamond reminds colleagues.
  9. Haley Manigold, second from left, and Armwood High School classmates Maria Medina and Madison Harvey take a photo with Sen. Tom Lee, who is sponsoring their legislation, and teacher Tony Pirotta.  They presented their bill in the Senate Education Committee on Dec. 9, 2019. [EMILY L. MAHONEY  |  Times Staff]
    Armwood High senior Haley Manigold discusses her effort to convince lawmakers to adopt testing legislation.
  10. Florida Senate President Bill Galvano, R- Bradenton. [SCOTT KEELER | Tampa Bay Times]
    Sen. Janet Cruz, D-Tampa, said she thinks Republican leaders want to keep the number under wraps because it points to the controversial program’s “failure.”
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement