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NBCSN’s Jeremy Roenick blasts officiating during Lightning’s win over Bruins

The NBC Sports Network studio analyst was particularly upset by two non-calls late in the Lightning's Game 2 win.
Lightning defenseman Anton Stralman puts a stick into the glove of Boston's Brad Marchand on a late third-period breakaway. [Photo from video]
Lightning defenseman Anton Stralman puts a stick into the glove of Boston's Brad Marchand on a late third-period breakaway. [Photo from video]
Published May 1, 2018

NBC Sports Network hockey analyst Jeremy Roenick called the officiating during the Lightning's 4-2 win over the Bruins Monday night "unacceptable" during the postgame studio show.

Roenick has been critical of the officials' work throughout the playoffs, but two noncalls late in Monday's game particularly drew his ire.

Most egregious was the slash by Lightning defenseman Anton Stralman to Brad Marchand's glove as Marchand broke in alone on goalie Andrei Vasilevskiy in the final minutes.

Had the slash been called, Marchand would have been granted a penalty shot and a chance to tie the game at 3-3.

"You have a chance, with the most dangerous player on the ice, to score a goal to tie it, and the slash is right on the hands," Roenick said. "… That's not a slash? That is the definition of the new slashing rule."

The play stood in contrast to what Roenick considered a "rinky-dink, ticky-tack" call on Boston's Torey Krug for slashing Brayden Point in the leg pad in a non-shooting situation early in the game.

Roenick also wasn't happy that the officials allowed a cross-check by the Lightning's Dan Girardi to the back of Boston's David Pastrnak into the end boards in the final minute.

"How can none of these be called at the most crucial part of a hockey game, in the playoffs?" Roenick said.

He  didn't stop there.

"It's unacceptable, it's got to be better" he said. "It's too inconsistent. And if they don't, there's going to be a lot of complaining, not only on the ice, but all over the hockey world."