Advertisement
  1. Breaking News

Trump drops citizenship question from census

President Donald Trump is joined by Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross and Attorney General William Barr, right, as he speaks in the Rose Garden at the White House in Washington, Thursday, July 11, 2019. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
Published Jul. 11

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump abandoned his controversial bid to inject a citizenship question into next year's census Thursday, instead directing federal agencies to try to compile the information using existing databases.

He insisted he was "not backing down," declaring in a Rose Garden announcement that the goal was simple and reasonable: "a clear breakdown of the number of citizens and non-citizens that make up the United States population."

But the decision was clearly a reversal, after the Supreme Court blocked his effort by disputing his administration's rationale for demanding that census respondents declare whether or not they were citizens. Trump had said last week that he was "very seriously" considering an executive order to try to force the question. The government has already begun the lengthy and expensive process of printing the census questionnaire without it, and such a move would surely have drawn an immediate legal challenge.

Trump's efforts to add the question on the decennial census had drawn fury and backlash from critics who complained that it was political, meant to discourage participation, not only by people living in the country illegally but also by citizens who fear that participating would expose noncitizen family members to repercussions.

Dale Ho, director of the American Civil Liberties Union's Voting Rights Project, and the lawyer who argued the Supreme Court case, celebrated Thursday's announcement by the president, saying: "Trump's attempt to weaponize the census ends not with a bang but a whimper."

Trump said he would be signing an executive order directing every federal department and agency to provide the Commerce Department with all records pertaining to the number of citizens and noncitizens in the country, including the Department of Homeland Security and the Social Security Administration.

The Census Bureau already has access to Social Security, food stamp and federal prison records, all of which contain citizenship information.

Trump, citing Census Bureau projections, predicted that using previously available records, the administration could determine the citizenship of 90 percent of the population "or more."

"Ultimately this will allow us to have a more complete count of citizens than through asking the single question alone," he contended.

But it is still unclear what Trump intends to do with the citizenship information. At one point he suggested it could help states that "may want to draw state and local legislative districts based upon the voter-eligible population." That would mark a change from how districts are drawn currently, based on the entire population, and could increase Republican political power.

Attorney General William Barr said there was disagreement over whether "illegal aliens" can be included for apportionment purposes. "Depending on the resolution of that dispute, this data may be relevant to those considerations," he said.

The Census Bureau has stressed repeatedly that it could produce better citizenship data without adding the question.

In fact, the bureau had recommended combining information from the annual American Community Survey with records held by other federal agencies that already include citizenship records.

"This would result in higher quality data produced at lower cost," deputy Census Bureau Director Ron Jarmin had written in a December 2017 email to a Justice Department official.

But Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, who oversees the Census Bureau, ultimately rejected that approach and ordered the citizenship question be added to the census.

The American Community Survey, which polls 3.5 million U.S. households every year, already includes questions about respondents' citizenship.

Trump's administration had faced numerous roadblocks to adding the question, beginning with the ruling by the Supreme Court temporarily barring its inclusion on the grounds that the government's justification was insufficient. Two federal judges also rejected the Justice Department's plan to replace the legal team fighting for inclusion.

Refusing to concede, Trump had insisted his administration push forward, suggesting last week that officials might be able to add an addendum to the questionnaire with the question after it was printed. He has also toyed with the idea of halting the constitutionally mandated survey while the legal fight ensued.

Barr said he was confident the census question would have eventually survived legal review but the process would have taken too long to work its way through the courts.

Trump had offered multiple explanations for why he believed the question was necessary to include in the once-a-decade population count that determines the allocation of seats in the House of Representatives for the next 10 years and the distribution of some $675 billion in federal spending.

"You need it for Congress, for districting. You need it for appropriations. Where are the funds going? How many people are there? Are they citizens? Are they not citizens? You need it for many reasons," he told reporters last week, despite the fact that congressional districts are based on total population, regardless of residents' national origin or immigration status.

If immigrants are undercounted, Democrats fear that would pull money and political power away from Democratic-led cities where immigrants tend to cluster, and shift it to whiter, rural areas where Republicans do well.

Senate Democratic Leader Chuck Schumer on Thursday called Trump's efforts "outrageous" and accused him of pushing the question "to intimidate minorities, particularly Latinos, from answering the census so that it undercounts those communities and Republicans can redraw congressional districts to their advantage."

"He thinks he can just issue executive orders and go around the Congress, go around established law and try to bully the courts," Schumer said from the Senate floor. He predicted the effort would be thwarted by the courts.

___

Associated Press writers Darlene Superville and Matthew Daly contributed to this report.

ALSO IN THIS SECTION

  1. The future site of the $64 million Imagine Clearwater downtown waterfront redevelopment project. On Nov. 21, 2019, the Clearwater City Council voted to authorize up to $30 million in bonds to help pay for the city. [Times]
    The bonds give Clearwater a funding source to help pay for the project, but much remains to be done. The lone no vote came from the only council member up for re-election.
  2. Attorney General Avichai Mandelblit charged Netanyahu with fraud, breach of trust and accepting bribes in three different scandals. It is the first time a sitting Israeli prime minister has been charged with a crime. Mandelblit was set to issue a formal statement later Thursday. (AP Photo/Oded Balilty) ODED BALILTY  |  AP
    Attorney General Avichai Mandelblit charged Netanyahu with fraud, breach of trust and accepting bribes in three different scandals.
  3. A 2017 aerial photo of Coachman Park in Clearwater, the future site of Clearwater’s re-imagined waterfront. LUIS SANTANA  |  Tampa Bay Times
    If a vote passes, the city will have solid funding for about 80 percent of the plan’s total cost.
  4. Joshua Scott, 26, and Jessica Vollrath, 47, were charged with operating a chop shop and two counts of grand theft auto. Hillsborough Sheriff's Office
    Two people were arrested after stolen vehicles were discovered at their home. They were stripping vehicles and selling the parts, deputies said.
  5. Check tampabay.com for the latest breaking news and updates. Tampa Bay Times
    The tow truck driver was on Ulmerton Road when the woman ran into his path, according to the Florida Highway Patrol.
  6. Pinellas-Pasco Circuit Judge Pamela Campbell during a hearing to review the guardianship cases once overseen by Traci Hudson, who faces criminal charges in one of those cases. Hudson was not present during Wednesday's hearing in a St. Petersburg courtroom. Pinellas sheriff's detectives say she stole more than $500,000 from an elderly man for whom she held power of attorney. Court records show she was appointed as a guardian in about two dozen cases. DIRK SHADD  |  Tampa Bay Times
    Traci Hudson had served as guardian overseeing the affairs of 26 people until her arrest on a charge of exploitation of the elderly. Her handling of those cases will be reviewed.
  7. The Clearwater City Council is discussing where to put its new City Hall building. This is a file photo of the old City Hall building downtown. JIM DAMASKE  |  Tampa Bay Times
    City staff will decide between 10 potential sites for a new City Hall building.
  8. DOUGLAS R. CLIFFORD   |   Times
A shot taken on June 4, 2019 during the 12-week demolition of the Harborview Center which began in April on the corner of Cleveland Street and Osceola Avenue in downtown Clearwater. The project is a key part of the city's roughly $64-million Imagine Clearwater waterfront redevelopment project. Will residents move downtown once it is done? DOUGLAS R. CLIFFORD  |  Tampa Bay Times
    “It’s our biggest challenge,” one city official said.
  9. FILE - In this Thursday, Feb. 22, 2018 file photo, Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi speaks to reporters outside the West Wing of the White House in Washington, after meeting with President Donald Trump about about responses to school shootings. Bondi is preparing to defend Trump against accusations that he pressured a foreign government to aid his re-election campaign. And she’s stepping down from a lobbying where she represented foreign interests (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File) J. SCOTT APPLEWHITE  |  AP
    The special advisor to President Trump incorrectly stated Sondland’s role while appearing on national TV ahead of the EU ambassador’s testimony.
  10. Check tampabay.com for the latest breaking news and updates. TMCCARTY  |  times staff
    The driver’s injuries appear non-life threatening, and a suspect is in custody.
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement