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  1. Environment

Blacktip sharks begin annual migration to Florida's south Atlantic coast

The annual Blacktip shark migration season is in full force. Florida Atlantic University has been tracking these apex predators by air and sea.
Published Feb. 28

Thousands of blackfin sharks are making their annual migration to seek the warmer waters along south Florida's Atlantic coast.

Dr. Stephen Kajiura, a researcher at Florida Atlantic University, has been tracking the migration patterns of these apex predators by air and sea. Now Kajiura's latest tool is providing thorough details about their every move.

He is capturing their movements and gathering detailed information through a $5,000 reusable radio and satellite sensor attached to their dorsal fins for two to four days. Data from these "shark diaries" records information, including how often they swish their tails, at what depth they prefer to swim, and at what time of day they swim close to the beach — proving beneficial to lifeguards responsible for beach safety.

Data collected from the sensors will help Kajiura continue to monitor the oceans and census populations, as well as the sharks' responses to climate change.

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