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  1. Arts & Entertainment

Rain barrels fill needs for garden

Rain barrels are a great way to conserve water. They can be decorated, but do so before you install hardware so you don’t have to paint around it.
Published Aug. 21, 2014

Gardens typically get abundant water during rainy seasons, but suffer during dry spells.

Often, thoughts turn to, "How do I water without running my water bill sky high?"

A rain barrel could be part of the solution.

It's hard to justify rain barrels for major landscapes, but they are quite practical for small vegetable and flower gardens, especially plants grown in containers, according to gardeners.

More important, rain barrels benefit the environment.

"Installing a rain barrel is one of the easiest things a homeowner can do to protect water resources," says Julia Hille-grass, team leader with askHRgreen.org, an environmental public awareness program in Virginia.

"Rain barrels pull double duty by providing a free source of water for outdoor uses while preventing water pollution. When you catch rainwater instead of sending it down the storm drain, it prevents pollutants like fertilizer, pet waste and roadway grime from dumping into local waterways.

"Plus with your free source of water, you'll be conserving water and the energy used to treat and deliver tap water to your home. It's an all-around great addition to any home.

"Watering plants, washing your car, even giving your dog a bath — all great ways to use the rainwater you collect."

While you can purchase a pricey rain barrel from a retail source, you can make your own for about $50, proof "going green" doesn't have to be expensive, adds Hillegrass.

If you are a do-it-yourselfer, master gardener Dennis Wool says YouTube has the best how-to videos that show a variety of ways to make a barrel. He recommends using food-grade plastic barrels because some barrels can contain hazardous materials that should not be recycled.

"From very simple designs to elaborate combinations that link multiple barrels together, all can be found under the search 'rain barrels,' " says Wool.

Many water conservationists also go a step further — decorating their rain barrels in fanciful or practical ways. "One of our members painted her rain barrel to blend into the brickwork and siding of her home — pretty clever," says Wool.

If you want to paint your rain barrel, first prime it, then use acrylic paint. Once your design is done and painting is finished, clear coat it to preserve its beauty.

Decorating tips

Some additional barrel-decorating tips from master gardeners include:

• Paint before installing hardware so you don't have to paint around it.

• Use stencils for decorative designs.

• Use branches, leaves or any materials or shapes to spray on silhouettes.

• Paint your barrel the same color as your home.

• Use it as a fun project for kids.

Installing it

Rain barrels should be placed immediately adjacent to downspouts, according to Wool.

"Most designs work best when the barrel is raised by stacking several cinder blocks or making a stand/bench for it sit upon," he says.

Maintaining it

If you use water in the rain barrel regularly, mosquito breeding is not a problem, according to Wool. Otherwise, cover your opening with window screening material to keep mosquitoes out.

"One creative person put goldfish in their barrel to take care of the bugs, and it was a real eye-catcher," he says.

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