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  1. Life & Culture

If you miss Downton Abbey, these new period shows will get you through

Dakota Fanning, from left, Luke Evans and Daniel Bruhl in "The Alienist." (TNT)
Dakota Fanning, from left, Luke Evans and Daniel Bruhl in "The Alienist." (TNT)
Published Jan. 3, 2018

The Crown and Downton Abbey prove this niche drama has wide appeal. These three shows debuting in the coming months will sop up some of the hungry period drama fan base.

10 p.m., Jan. 22

Nineteenth century psychology, turn of the century fashion and a murder mystery all wrapped up in the seedy underbelly of New York City. It's 1896 and the city is being stalked by a brutal killer. Luke Evans plays John Moore, a New York Times reporter and illustrator who teams up with Dr. Laszlo Kreizler (Daniel Bruhl) to figure how who is killing boy sex workers and why. Kreizler labels himself an alienist, which in the 19th century meant he practiced an early form of criminal psychology. The two are called upon to investigate the violence in secret by none other than police commissioner Theodore Roosevelt. They're joined by Sara Howard (Dakota Fanning) a whip-smart young secretary who's determined to become New York's first female detective. Based on Caleb Carr's 1994 bestseller.

The Terror (AMC, 10 p.m., March 26): Ridley Scott (Alien, The Martian) heads back to television with this tense historical drama inspired by Dan Simmons' 2007 novel. The Terror explores the British Royal Navy's dangerous voyage as it attempts to char the Northwest Passage. The crew is soon pushed to the brink of extinction. Tobias Menzies (Outlander) and Jared Harris (Mad Men) star.

Howards End (Starz, TBA, April): This four-part drama on Starz adapted from the E.M Forster novel, already got the big screen treatment in 1992, starring Emma Thompson, who won the Oscar for this role. This time around, it's Hayley Atwell (Agent Carter) as the ruthless and independent Margaret Schlegel. Writer and director Kenneth Lonergan uses the longer format to explore sexism and the wealthy class in Britain at the beginning of the 20th century.