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Humane Society offers free pet food to government workers during shutdown

Count the Humane Society of Tampa Bay as the latest organization to provide assistance with the government shutdown in its 25th day.
The Humane Society announced on its Facebook page on Jan. 15, 2019, that it will offer free pet food to government workers in need.
Published Jan. 15

Count the Humane Society of Tampa Bay as the latest organization to provide assistance with the government shutdown in its 25th day.

The Humane Society announced on its Facebook page Tuesday that it will offer free pet food to government workers in need.

It is an extension of two other community programs — Food Distribution, for those who struggle with the cost of pet food, and Animeals, which delivers food for the elderly and those can't make it to the shelter.

The free food is available at the Humane Society's shelter at 3607 N Armenia Ave. in Tampa weekdays from noon-7 p.m., and weekends from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Verification is required.

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