Here's what you need to know about the Constitutional Amendments on the ballot:

10:56 p.m.: Check out a breakdown of how Floridians voted on the Constitutional Amendments here.

10:51 p.m.: Two other amendments have passed. Amendment 10 creates a counter-terrorism office and make the state veterans affairs department constitutionally required. Amendment 11 will revise the Constitution to remove some language, including a provision that stops "aliens ineligible for citizenship" from owning property and wording approving a high-speed rail system.

9:59 p.m.: Amendment 9, which bans offshore oil and gas drilling, was approved with 68.3 percent of the vote.

9:49 p.m.: Amendments 2 and 5 have passed. Amendment 2, which would cement an existing cap on non-homestead property assessments, passed with 66 percent. Amendment 5, which requires a two-thirds super-majority vote in the Legislature to impose, approve or raise state taxes and fees, passed with 66 percent.

9:11 p.m.: According to the New York Times, Amendment 4 has also passed with 64 percent of the vote. The landmark measure restores voting rights to 1.2 million Floridians with felony convictions.

Amendment 3, which gives voters the exclusive right to authorize gambling expansions, has also passed with 71 percent approval.

9:04 p.m.: The New York Times says it's official: Amendment 12 has passed with 78.6 percent of the vote. The amendment will bar public officials from lobbying both during their terms and for six years following, and restrict current public officers from using their office for personal gain.

The Times also says that Amendment 3 has passed, with a total vote of 71.3 percent. Amendment 3 will give voters the exclusive right to decide to authorize expansions of casino gambling in Florida.

9:01 p.m.: Amendment 1 still looks like it won't be reaching the 60 percent approval mark as it hovers at 58 percent.

8:31 p.m.: With 67 percent of all precincts reporting, Florida is poised to pass ALL of the Amendments except Amendment 1, which would have increased the homestead property tax exemption.

8:04 p.m.: So far, statewide results show the following amendments got 60 percent voter approval: Amendments 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13.

Amendment 4, which restores felons' voting rights, has 64 percent approval. Amendment 13, which bans dog racing, has 69 percent approval. The only amendment so far that has not reached the 60 percent mark is Amendment 1, which would have increased the homestead property tax exemption.

7:42 p.m.: With 93 of 390 precincts reporting, here's a look at the Amendment results so far in Hillsborough County. Amendment 3, which would give voters control of casino gambling, is at 67 percent. Amendment 12, which would place lobbying restrictions on public officials, is at 72 percent.

7:30 p.m.: Here's a look at results in Pinellas County so far. With 50 percent of precincts reporting, results show many of the Amendments are on the path toward passing. They need voter approval of 60 percent to pass.

Approval for Amendment 4, which restores voting rights for felons, is leading at 67 percent. Amendment 13, which would ban dog racing, is at 62 percent.

7:01 p.m.: Reporter Divya Kumar headed to the polls again this evening. She spoke to a resident who voted in favor of Amendment 4.

6:21 p.m.: Some big names are supporting Amendment 4.

5:57 p.m.: Tampa Bay Times reporter Divya Kumar spoke to residents as they left polling sites across Pinellas on Tuesday morning. Some of them weighed in on the Amendments:

4:52 p.m.: Hi! My name is Laura Morel and I will be reporting on the Constitutional Amendments throughout the day as we await polling results tonight.

There's a lot on the ballot this year, including 12 Constitutional Amendments that deal with a range of issues.  They include Amendment 6, which would create a bill of rights for crime victims and impose new requirements for judges, as well as Amendment 3, which would give voters the right to  authorize casino gambling in the state.

Among the most notable is Amendment 4, which would restore the voting rights of 1.2 million convicted felons in Florida.