TAMPA — It’s been nearly a decade since John Dingfelder held a seat on Tampa’s City Council and the 62-year-old politician finished Tuesday’s election just shy of being granted a second act.

Dingfelder clinched 48.96% of the vote in a four-way race to replace term-limited council member Yvonne Yolie Capin, not enough to avoid a runoff election on April 23. Corporate human relations manager Stephen Lytle, 36, finished with 20.26% of the vote and will face Dingfelder.

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Gas South marketing manager Nicholas Glover, 36, was not to far behind at 19.74% and Realtor Vibha Shevade, 38, grabbed 11.04%.

Returning to City Council as an at-large member would be a new role for Dingfelder, who represented South Tampa’s District 4 from 2003 to 2010. Capin was appointed to a partial term in July 2010 after Dingfelder resigned during an unsuccessful bid against Sandy Murman for a spot on the Hillsborough County Commission.

That effort was one of at least seven major election campaigns for Dingfelder since 2003, when he was first elected to Tampa’s City Council. In both 2003 and 2007, Dingfelder cinched enough votes in a three-way race to win the seat without a runoff election. On his website, he touts that he only raised $40,171 for that first victory.

For his comeback campaign, records show Dingfelder brought in just under $147,000 in monetary and in-kind contributions — more money than all three of his competitors combined — though about $50,000 of those donations came from his own pocket.

A lawyer and former schoolteacher before he joined City Council, Dingfelder's campaign efforts were bolstered by his wife-turned-campaign manager, Lynn Marvin. Dingfelder has spent most of his time since 2010 working as a lawyer and serving on numerous civic boards, including the Tampa General Hospital board and the Humane Society Board.

Lytle is a human resources manager with Walmart’s health care division. He has served with philanthropic and civic groups, including Tampa’s Citizen Budget Advisory Committee, and he’s been endorsed by Hillsborough County Commissioner Sandy Murman. Lytle is registered under no party affiliation, and he has raised just shy of $62,300 for his campaign.

It’s been nearly a decade since John Dingfelder held a seat on Tampa’s City Council and the 62-year-old politician finished Tuesday’s election just shy of being granted a second act.

Dingfelder clinched almost 49 percent of the vote in a four-way race to replace term-limited council member Yvonne Yolie Capin. He will face either Walmart corporate human relations manager Stephen Lytle, 36, who finished with 20.23 percent of the vote, or Gas South marketing manager Nicholas Glover, 36, who was not far behind at 19.74 percent. Realtor Vibha Shevade had about 11 percent of the vote.

“We’re thrilled to have done as well as we did,” Dingfelder said after the final results. “It’s the most crowded field we’ve ever been involved in - the most candidates I’ve ever had to go up against before was 3 or 4, so that made a big difference. We had a feeling we’d probably be headed toward a runoff.”

Returning to City Council as an at-large member would be a new role for Dingfelder, who represented South Tampa’s District 4 from 2003 to 2010. Capin was appointed to a partial term in July 2010 after Dingfelder resigned during an unsuccessful bid against Sandy Murman for a spot on the Hillsborough County Commission.

That effort was one of at least seven major election campaigns for Dingfelder since 2003, when he was first elected to Tampa’s City Council. In both 2003 and 2007, Dingfelder cinched enough votes in a three-way race to win the seat without a runoff election. On his website, he touts that he only raised $40,171 for that first victory.

For his comeback campaign, records show Dingfelder brought in just under $147,000 in monetary and in-kind contributions — more money than all three of his competitors combined — though about $50,000 of those donations came from his own pocket.

A lawyer and former schoolteacher before he joined City Council, Dingfelder's campaign efforts were bolstered by his wife-turned-campaign manager, Lynn Marvin. Dingfelder has spent most of his time since 2010 working as a lawyer and serving on numerous civic boards, including the Tampa General Hospital board and the Humane Society Board.

Lytle has served with philanthropic and civic groups, including Tampa’s Citizen Budget Advisory Committee, and he’s been endorsed by Hillsborough County Commissioner Sandy Murman. Lytle is registered under no party affiliation, and he has raised just shy of $62,300 for his campaign.

Lynn Dingfelder, wife of City Council District 3 candidate John Dingfelder, and Marvin Youngblood, campaign manager for District 2 candidate Joe Robinson, campaign in the rain on Tuesday at the voting precinct at Tampa Garden Club. [MONICA HERNDON | Times]
Lynn Dingfelder, wife of City Council District 3 candidate John Dingfelder, and Marvin Youngblood, campaign manager for District 2 candidate Joe Robinson, campaign in the rain on Tuesday at the voting precinct at Tampa Garden Club. [MONICA HERNDON | Times]