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What was true and false in Thursday night’s debate

When passions flare, sometimes facts fizzle.
Democratic presidential candidates attend the start of the first primary debate for the 2020 elections at the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts in downtown Miami. [AL DIAZ |MIAMI HERALD]
Published Jun. 28

Democrats let loose their anti-Trump passions while attempting to showcase their diverse vantage points on gun control, race relations, immigration, healthcare, tax reform and more during the second night of debates at Miami’s Adrienne Arsht Center.

Former Vice President Joe Biden and Sen. Bernie Sanders were the two most recognizable men positioned center-stage. But eight lesser-known candidates in the race to be the next president of the United States sparred with them.

Sen. Kamala Harris of California and South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg delivered passionate remarks that especially sought to challenge Biden as the face of an old-guard lacking the progressive vision the party needs to move America forward.

But when passions flare, sometimes facts fizzle. Here’s a look at some of the statements that got our attention as we monitored the second night of the 2020 Democratic debates.

Joe Biden: “I did not oppose busing in America. What I opposed is busing ordered by the Department of Education. That’s what I opposed.”

Bernie Sanders: “Today the worker in the middle of our economy is making no more money than he or she made 45 years ago.”

John Hickenlooper: “I share the sense of urgency. I’m a scientist, so I recognize that we’re within 10 or 12 years of actually suffering irreversible damage (of climate change).”

Bernie Sanders: “President Trump, you’re not standing up for working families when you try to throw 32 million people off the health care that they have.”

Michael Bennet: “Bernie mentioned that the taxes that we would have to pay — because of those taxes, Vermont rejected Medicare for All.”

Eric Swalwell: “This president, though, for immigrants, there is nothing he will not do to separate a family, cage a child, or erase their existence by weaponizing the census.”

Andrew Yang: “We automated away 4 million manufacturing jobs in Michigan, Ohio and Pennsylvania and Wisconsin, and we’re about to do the same thing to millions of retail jobs, call center jobs, fast food jobs, truck driving jobs and on and on through the economy.”

Marianne Williamson: “So many Americans have unnecessary chronic illnesses — so many more compared to other countries.”

Pete Buttigieg: (Addressing his response to a police shooting of a black man in his city) “Look, we’ve taken so many steps toward police accountability that, you know, the (Fraternal Order of Police) just denounced me for too much accountability.”

Check the rulings here at PolitiFact.

RELATED COVERAGE: What was true and false in Wednesday night’s debate

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