Advertisement
  1. Florida Politics
  2. /
  3. The Buzz

Behold the huge wealth gap between Ron DeSantis and Rick Scott

DeSantis reported a net worth of $283,605 as of Dec. 31. Rick Scott, who served the first week of this year as governor, reported to the state a net worth of $91.75 million as of the end of 2018.
Florida Gov. Rick Scott, left, shakes hands with gubernatorial candidate Ron DeSantis as he introduces him to supporters at Republican rally Thursday, Sept. 6, 2018, in Orlando, Fla. Scott is trying to unseat Democratic U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson. (AP Photo/John Raoux) FLJR105
Florida Gov. Rick Scott, left, shakes hands with gubernatorial candidate Ron DeSantis as he introduces him to supporters at Republican rally Thursday, Sept. 6, 2018, in Orlando, Fla. Scott is trying to unseat Democratic U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson. (AP Photo/John Raoux) FLJR105
Published Jul. 3, 2019

Gov. Ron DeSantis’ net worth dropped nearly 9 percent in 2018 as he left Congress and made a successful run for governor.

DeSantis reported a net worth of $283,605 as of Dec. 31, down from $310,971 at the end of 2017, according to a new financial disclosure posted Monday on the Florida Commission on Ethics website.

Meanwhile, Rick Scott, who served the first week of this year as governor, reported to the state a net worth of $91.75 million as of the end of 2018. Scott, now a U.S. senator, was the wealthiest governor in Florida history.

State officials faced a Monday deadline to file updated disclosures, which typically detail their finances as of the end of 2018.

DeSantis’ new report included a Ponte Vedra Beach home he sold in March for $460,000, according to St. Johns County property records. DeSantis listed the Ponte Vedra Beach home as worth $450,000 at the end of 2018, up from a $400,000 price tag he placed on the property a year earlier.

DeSantis, who resigned his congressional seat in September after his primary-election victory, reported $116,000 in income last year from the U.S. House, a position that paid him $174,000 in 2017.

DeSantis also picked up $15,297 from the state last year while governor-elect in the transition period.

Unlike Scott, who has widespread financial holdings, DeSantis listed just over $3,500 in stock in Scottrade accounts in U.S. Steel and SiriusXM.

The sale of the Ponte Vedra Beach home will also cost DeSantis some rental income, as the first family made $5,500 rental income in 2018 and $27,500 the year earlier.

When listing his assets at the end of 2017, DeSantis reported a $275,000 home in Palm Coast. According to the Flagler County Property Appraiser’s office, the Palm Coast home was sold for $275,000 on May 15, 2018.

Both DeSantis properties had mortgages, including $263,100 on the Ponte Vedra Beach property as 2018 ended.

DeSantis was usually ranked as one of the least wealthy members of Congress. For example, he was ranked 391st among the 435 House members in terms of net worth in 2015 by OpenSecrets.com, when his net worth was estimated at $54,000. Federal disclosure rules are different from Florida, which requires more exact numbers.

Scott, who made a fortune in the healthcare industry and other businesses before entering politics, had started 2018 with a reported net worth of $232.6 million. Scott spent an estimated $64 million of his own money for his successful U.S. Senate run against Democrat Bill Nelson.

State records don’t require candidates and elected officials to include investments by spouses.

As part of Scott’s federal filing last year, he disclosed former first lady Ann Scott was worth between $171 million and $208 million.

ALSO IN THIS SECTION

  1. Democratic presidential candidate, former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg speaks at the ​U.S. Conference of Mayors' Winter Meeting, Wednesday, Jan. 22, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky) [PATRICK SEMANSKY  |  AP]
    It’s also the first visit by any Democratic contender this year
  2. Jimmy Patronis had been appointed to the state’s Public Service Commission by Gov. Scott.
    FDLE cited a ‘potential conflict,’ Leon County State Attorney Jack Campbell said.
  3. Gov. Ron DeSantis. [STEVE CANNON  |  AP]
    Florida students will read more classical literature and learn math differently, according to summary documents.
  4. Florida House Speaker José Oliva made hospital deregulation one of his top priorities. [SCOTT KEELER | Tampa Bay Times]
    Speaker José Oliva slammed pharmaceutical companies in his opening day speech, but a bill to place $100 caps on co-payments for insulin will not pass this year. In fact, it won’t even get a hearing.
  5. The Florida Supreme Court, Wednesday, May 1, 2019. [SCOTT KEELER  |  Tampa Bay Times]
    Judge Renatha Francis has not been a member of the Florida Bar for 10 years.
  6. State Rep. Adam Hattersley, D-Riverview, speaks before volunteers with the gun control advocacy group Moms Demand Action outside the Florida Capitol on Thursday, Jan. 23, 2020. [[LAWRENCE MOWER | Tampa Bay Times]]
    Like it has since the Parkland massacre, the gun debate is growing fierce in Tallahassee. But there are some significant changes this year.
  7. West Palm Beach Mayor Keith James talks with his Director of Communications Kathleen Walter while going over the state of the city address in his office at the City of West Palm Beach municipal building in West Palm Beach, Florida on Wednesday, January 15, 2020.  [OCTAVIO JONES  |  Times]
    West Palm Beach Mayor Keith James leads a city about the same size as Buttigieg’s South Bend. Here’s what his day looks like. Is this presidential experience?
  8. The Florida Supreme Court, Wednesday, May 1, 2019. [SCOTT KEELER  |  Tampa Bay Times]
    “Death is indeed different,” wrote the lone dissenting justice. “This Court has taken a giant step backward."
  9. State Rep. Erin Grall, R-Vero Beach, presents legislation to create a new chapter of Florida law dedicated to parents' rights when dealing with government and other agencies, during a committee meeting Jan. 23, 2020. [The Florida Channel]
    Parents have been marginalized by bureaucracy, and need to be empowered in law, sponsor Rep. Erin Grall says.
  10. Wichita State Shockers center Jaime Echenique (21) and USF Bulls guard David Collins (0) battle for the loose ball during the second half at the Yuengling Center in Tampa on Tuesday. [OCTAVIO JONES  |  Times]
    Lawmakers may require public colleges and universities to ask permission before selling naming rights.
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement