No one expected this one, and so there was no name. It was well before hurricane season when the storm swept in around midnight on March 12, 1993.

Dubbed the “no-name storm,” it slammed into Florida from the Gulf of Mexico packing winds of more than 90 mph, strong rain, lightning and tornadoes.

“This could be the storm of the century,” according to the National Weather Service.

From the archives: ‘No-name storm’ blasted Tampa Bay 25 years ago

Fifteen people died, including four children. Hundreds had to abandon their homes due to substantial flooding and 2 million lost power just as they dealt with the cold temperatures left in the wake.

Gov. Lawton Chiles declared a state of emergency in five counties and President Bill Clinton declared them disaster areas to facilitate federal aid.

Mike Blakely (in red) and his son, Chris Blakeley (in yellow) try to remove their boat from a Town & Country street as a truck passes by offering them some assistance during the no-name storm of 1993. [Times file (1993)]
Mike Blakely (in red) and his son, Chris Blakeley (in yellow) try to remove their boat from a Town & Country street as a truck passes by offering them some assistance during the no-name storm of 1993. [Times file (1993)]
TFD driver/engineer David Bibiloni braves deep water and heavy winds to tell residents of the Sunset Park area of Tampa of a mandatory evacuation due to rising water. [Times files (1993)]
TFD driver/engineer David Bibiloni braves deep water and heavy winds to tell residents of the Sunset Park area of Tampa of a mandatory evacuation due to rising water. [Times files (1993)]
[Times files (1993)]
[Times files (1993)]
[Times files (1993)]
[Times files (1993)]
[Times files (1993)]
[Times files (1993)]
A boat ramp is nowhere to be seen as heavy rain and flooding turned streets into rivers around the Tampa Bay area during the no-name storm of 1993. [Times files (1993)]
A boat ramp is nowhere to be seen as heavy rain and flooding turned streets into rivers around the Tampa Bay area during the no-name storm of 1993. [Times files (1993)]
A truck passes through deep water in a Town & County street during the no-name storm of 1993. [Times files (1993)]
A truck passes through deep water in a Town & County street during the no-name storm of 1993. [Times files (1993)]
Floodwaters picked up many boats and crashed them into yards and barriers. Memories of the disaster remain vivid 10 years later in the minds of flood victims. [Times files (1993)]
Floodwaters picked up many boats and crashed them into yards and barriers. Memories of the disaster remain vivid 10 years later in the minds of flood victims. [Times files (1993)]
[Times files (1993)]
[Times files (1993)]
Bellet returned to Pandora Drive early Monday morning on March 15, 1993 in the aftermath of the storm. The opening under the pinnacle of the roof is where Bellet and then-roommate, Kimberly Kelly escaped during the early morning of 3/13/93. [Times files (1993)]
Bellet returned to Pandora Drive early Monday morning on March 15, 1993 in the aftermath of the storm. The opening under the pinnacle of the roof is where Bellet and then-roommate, Kimberly Kelly escaped during the early morning of 3/13/93. [Times files (1993)]