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Tropical storm no longer expected, South Florida hit with heavy rain

The Tampa Bay area will feel minimal impacts from the storm.
Water laps at homes in the neighborhood of the 700 block of Northwest W 17th Court in Miami Saturday morning, June 4, 2022, from a disturbance heading toward Florida's west coast.
Water laps at homes in the neighborhood of the 700 block of Northwest W 17th Court in Miami Saturday morning, June 4, 2022, from a disturbance heading toward Florida's west coast. [ DAVID NEAL | Miami Herald ]
Published Jun. 4|Updated Jun. 4

The disturbance that brought flooding rain to South Florida overnight began its trek over the state Saturday morning, and is forecast to bring more downpours the rest of the day.

The tropical storm warning for the Florida Keys was discontinued at 11 a.m. The warning is still in place for Florida’s east coast. All of South Florida remains under a flood watch. The system was about 35 miles northeast of Naples and 100 miles southwest of Vero Beach, according to the National Hurricane Center’s 11 a.m. advisory. It was quickly moving northeast over Florida and could possibly turn into Tropical Storm Alex off the state’s east coast by evening as it moves into the Atlantic, according to the hurricane center. On Monday, it should be near or to the north of Bermuda, which is now under a tropical storm watch.

The Tampa Bay area, meanwhile, should only experience spatters of rain and some gusty winds on Saturday before the system exits Florida.

A woman walks her dog around a downed tree after a night of heavy rain and wind off Brickell Bay Drive in the Brickell neighborhood of Miami, Florida, on Saturday, June 4, 2022.
A woman walks her dog around a downed tree after a night of heavy rain and wind off Brickell Bay Drive in the Brickell neighborhood of Miami, Florida, on Saturday, June 4, 2022. [ DANIEL A. VARELA | Miami Herald ]

Because South Florida is on the wetter side of the system, also known as the “dirty” side, the region will still get the worst weather as it crosses the state. The rain should start to diminish in the afternoon, forecasters say.

“The risk for major flooding rain continues through the early afternoon as the last bands associated with PTC One make their way through South FL. Please stay weather aware and don’t drive through moving or standing water!” the National Weather Service in Miami tweeted.

South Florida is expected to see a total of six to 10 inches of rain Saturday, with some isolated areas seeing up to 15 inches of rain. The Keys are expected to see a total of four to eight inches of rain, with some isolated areas seeing up to 10 inches, according to the hurricane center.

So far, in the past 24 hours, the National Weather Service in Miami has received reports of areas across Miami-Dade seeing more than six inches of rain, with some areas seeing up to 11 inches.

Two garbage dumpsters sit half submerged due to flooding off Brickell Bay Drive in the Brickell neighborhood of Miami, Florida, on Saturday, June 4, 2022.
Two garbage dumpsters sit half submerged due to flooding off Brickell Bay Drive in the Brickell neighborhood of Miami, Florida, on Saturday, June 4, 2022. [ DANIEL A. VARELA | Miami Herald ]

TV news showed some parts of Brickell so flooded, cars were stuck Saturday morning. The bad weather has also messed with travel plans, with dozens of flights expected to be canceled or delayed at Miami International Airport and Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport. AAA says it also saw an uptick in service calls this weekend. “It just goes to show, you don’t need a name for it to have big impacts,” said National Weather Service Meteorologist Ana Torres-Vazquez.

A view looking southwest of stalled out cars due to flooding on Southwest First Avenue in the Brickell neighborhood of Miami, Florida, on Saturday, June 4, 2022.
A view looking southwest of stalled out cars due to flooding on Southwest First Avenue in the Brickell neighborhood of Miami, Florida, on Saturday, June 4, 2022. [ DANIEL A. VARELA | Miami Herald ]

Miami Herald staff writers Devoun Cetoute, Michelle Marchante and David Goodhue contributed to this report

• • •

2022 Tampa Bay Times Hurricane Guide

IT'S STORM SEASON: Get ready and stay informed at tampabay.com/hurricane.

RISING THREAT: Tampa Bay will flood. Here's how to get ready.

DOUBLE-CHECK: Checklists for building all kinds of hurricane kits

PHONE IT IN: Use your smartphone to protect your data, documents and photos.

SELF-CARE: Protect your mental health during a hurricane.

• • •

Rising Threat: A special report on flood risk and climate change

PART 1: The Tampa Bay Times partnered with the National Hurricane Center for a revealing look at future storms.

PART 2: Even weak hurricanes can cause huge storm surges. Experts say people don't understand the risk.

PART 3: Tampa Bay has huge flood risk. What should we do about it?

INTERACTIVE MAP: Search your Tampa Bay neighborhood to see the hurricane flood risk.

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