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Didn’t evacuate for Hurricane Ian? Here’s how to get help.

The Florida government posted a form for those who are sheltering in place to use in case first responders need to find them.
Waves crash along the Ballast Point Pier ahead of Hurricane Ian, Wednesday in Tampa. The U.S. National Hurricane Center says Ian's most damaging winds have begun hitting Florida's southwest coast as the storm made landfall.
Waves crash along the Ballast Point Pier ahead of Hurricane Ian, Wednesday in Tampa. The U.S. National Hurricane Center says Ian's most damaging winds have begun hitting Florida's southwest coast as the storm made landfall. [ CHRIS O'MEARA | AP ]
Published Sep. 28|Updated Sep. 28

As Hurricane Ian makes landfall in southwestern Florida, state officials are asking residents who are sheltering in place to provide some critical information that can be relayed to first responders in case of an emergency.

The shelter-in-place survey asks for some basic information such as the address where you are, how many people are with you, if you have any pets, etc.

Related: Florida has an emergency contact information system. Here’s how to sign up.

In a press conference Wednesday, Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis said most people in evacuation zones left, but some residents “chose to stay.” He said it is particularly important for those residents to fill out the form so that first responders in these hazardous areas can identify those who may need help.

The state is asking the U.S. Department of Defense for additional airlift hoists and high-water vehicles to aid efforts to help people in areas that have been highly impacted by Ian, DeSantis said.

More than 300,000 people in the Tampa Bay area were told to evacuate. Pinellas County had mandatory evacuation orders for zones A, B and C. Hillsborough County had a mandatory evacuation for zones A and B.

In the Tampa Bay area Wednesday morning, large amounts of water from the bay drained out into the Gulf of Mexico as Ian approached — a result of its location north of the storm’s center as the winds turned counterclockwise toward the Gulf. The anticipated storm surge has not yet gushed back into the bay, but Tampa Bay is expected to get as much as 4 to 6 feet of storm surge from Ian, according to the National Hurricane Center.

Forecasters say Tampa Bay could get as much as 4 to 6 feet of storm surge from Hurricane Ian.
Forecasters say Tampa Bay could get as much as 4 to 6 feet of storm surge from Hurricane Ian. [ National Hurricane Center ]

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2022 Tampa Bay Times Hurricane Guide

ROAD CLOSURES: What to know about bridges, roads as Hurricane Ian approaches.

HOW TO TALK TO KIDS ABOUT THE HURRICANE: A school mental health expert says to let them know what’s happening, keep a routine and stay calm.

WHAT TO EXPECT IN A SHELTER: What to bring — and not bring — plus information on pets, keeping it civil and more.

WHAT TO DO IF HURRICANE DAMAGES YOUR HOME: Stay calm, then call your insurance company.

SAFEGUARD YOUR HOME: Storms and property damage go hand in hand. Here’s how to prepare.

IT'S STORM SEASON: Get ready and stay informed at tampabay.com/hurricane.

RISING THREAT: Tampa Bay will flood. Here's how to get ready.

DOUBLE-CHECK: Checklists for building all kinds of hurricane kits

PHONE IT IN: Use your smartphone to protect your data, documents and photos.

SELF-CARE: Protect your mental health during a hurricane.

• • •

Rising Threat: A special report on flood risk and climate change

PART 1: The Tampa Bay Times partnered with the National Hurricane Center for a revealing look at future storms.

PART 2: Even weak hurricanes can cause huge storm surges. Experts say people don't understand the risk.

PART 3: Tampa Bay has huge flood risk. What should we do about it?

INTERACTIVE MAP: Search your Tampa Bay neighborhood to see the hurricane flood risk.

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