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Forecasters watch Tropical Depression 12, disturbance in Atlantic

Neither system currently poses a threat to Florida or the United States.
The National Hurricane Center is watching two Atlantic systems: Tropical Depression 12, and a low-pressure system forecast to make its way to the Caribbean later this week.
The National Hurricane Center is watching two Atlantic systems: Tropical Depression 12, and a low-pressure system forecast to make its way to the Caribbean later this week. [ National Hurricane Center ]
Published Oct. 5|Updated Oct. 6

Tropical Depression 12 formed in the Atlantic Tuesday and another disturbance could make its way into the Caribbean later this week.

Neither system currently poses a threat to Florida or the United States.

According to the National Hurricane Center, Tropical Depression 12 was about 555 miles west of the Cabo Verde Islands, with maximum sustained winds of 35 mph, around 5 p.m. Wednesday. Forecasters said the system is moving to the west-northwest at about 10 mph.

Forecasters expect the storm to weaken slowly and become a low-pressure system by Thursday.

The hurricane center also is watching a system in the southeastern Caribbean Sea that is producing large storms over parts of the Windward Islands, South America and the surrounding area, according to the 8 p.m. update Wednesday.

Forecasters don’t expect the system to develop much as it moves west over South America’s north coast into Thursday. However, conditions are expected to become more favorable for the system to develop into a tropical depression by the time it arrives in the south-central Caribbean Sea in the next two or three days.

“While surface observations do suggest broad rotation and pressures are lower than 24 hours ago, there currently is no definitive proof that a well-defined circulation exists,” the hurricane center said Wednesday evening.

On Wednesday afternoon, Spectrum Bay News 9 Weather tweeted a graphic showing spaghetti models forecasting the system moving toward Central America, if it continues to develop. A strong high pressure from the north will stop the system from making its way into the Gulf of Mexico, according to Bay News 9.

“Regardless of development, heavy rainfall with localized flooding, as well as gusty winds to gale force, are expected over portions of the Windward Islands, northern portions of South America, and the ABC Islands during the next day or two,” the Hurricane Center said Wednesday afternoon.

The system has a 70% chance of further development in the next two days and a 90% chance in the next five days, the 8 p.m. update said.

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