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Hurricane season isn’t over yet: Forecasters watch 2 tropical storms

The last month of the 2022 hurricane season started with forecasters watching Tropical Storms Lisa and Martin.
 
The final month of this year’s hurricane season is off to a busy start as forecasters were watching two tropical storms on Tuesday.
The final month of this year’s hurricane season is off to a busy start as forecasters were watching two tropical storms on Tuesday. [ National Hurricane Center ]
Published Nov. 1, 2022|Updated Nov. 2, 2022

The final month of this year’s hurricane season is off to a busy start as forecasters were watching two tropical storms on Tuesday.

Tropical Storm Lisa formed on Monday and forecasters expected it to strengthen into a hurricane before hitting Central America on Wednesday.

Meanwhile, Tropical Storm Martin formed in the Atlantic on Tuesday, but wasn’t an immediate threat to land.

Neither pose a threat to Florida.

Related: Hurricane season isn’t over yet, Tampa Bay. Here’s what to expect.

Lisa was located about 175 miles east of Isa Roatan, Honduras, and about 285 miles east of Belize City as of 8 p.m. Tuesday. It was packing maximum sustained winds of 65 mph and was moving west at 15 mph.

A host of watches and warnings have been issued for parts of Central America including Belize, Guatemala, Honduras and Mexico.

Forecasters with the National Hurricane Center expect Lisa to intensify into a hurricane overnight and continue to gain strength on Wednesday.

“On the forecast track, the center of Lisa will move near or over the Bay Islands of Honduras early Wednesday, move near Belize late on Wednesday and over southeastern Mexico on Thursday,” the Hurricane Center said in an update Tuesday evening.

Related: Fewer evacuated to shelters during Hurricane Ian. How can Tampa Bay stay safe?

Meanwhile, Tropical Storm Martin had not prompted any watches or warnings, as the storm was in the central north Atlantic and wasn’t an immediate threat to land. The storm had maximum winds of 60 mph as of 4 p.m. Tuesday and was located about 630 miles east-northeast of Bermuda. Martin was moving east at 13 mph.

Forecasters expect Martin to become a hurricane by Wednesday night and it likely will be considered a “powerful extratropical system” by Thursday.

Hurricane season ends on Nov. 30.

Related: How to prepare for Florida hurricanes, and why you should start now

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