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4 named tropical systems formed in 39 hours, the first time in recorded history

None pose an imminent threat to Florida.
 
The National Hurricane Center on Tuesday was eyeing multiple systems in the Atlantic including two tropical storms, Harold and Franklin. None pose a threat to Florida.
The National Hurricane Center on Tuesday was eyeing multiple systems in the Atlantic including two tropical storms, Harold and Franklin. None pose a threat to Florida. [ The National Hurricane Center ]
Published Aug. 22, 2023|Updated Aug. 23, 2023

Tropical activity is showing no signs of slowing down after Tropical Storm Harold formed Tuesday and made landfall in Texas, adding to a quickly growing list of named storms this season.

The National Hurricane Center was watching two tropical storms — Harold and Franklin — along with three other weather disturbances across the Atlantic on Tuesday. None pose an imminent threat to Florida.

Related: WEDNESDAY UPDATE: Tropical Storm Franklin heads to Hispaniola, Harold weakens to depression

Tropical Storm Harold is the ninth named storm of the season (an unnamed subtropical storm formed in January). The tropical storm became the fourth named Atlantic storm in just 39 hours — the fastest time on record for four named storm formations, according to Philip Klotzbach, a meteorologist with Colorado State University.

In an afternoon update from the hurricane center, forecasters said Harold was about 20 miles east-southeast of Hebbronville, Texas, with maximum sustained winds of 45 mph. Harold was expected to bring heavy rains to south Texas through early Wednesday and produce areas of flash and urban flooding.

Harold was moving swiftly toward the west-northwest at 21 mph and forecasters expect the system to continue in that direction across south Texas. Forecasters also warned of flash flooding with mudslides across portions of Coahuila and northern Nuevo Leon in Mexico through Wednesday.

Tropical Storm Harold formed early Tuesday morning and is likely to bring heavy rain and some flooding to south Texas and parts of Mexico.
Tropical Storm Harold formed early Tuesday morning and is likely to bring heavy rain and some flooding to south Texas and parts of Mexico. [ The National Hurricane Center ]

Forecasters anticipate Tropical Storm Franklin will usher in heavy rainfall across portions of Puerto Rico and Hispaniola into Thursday. The heavy rain could produce areas of flash and urban flooding along with mudslides.

Franklin was about 230 miles south of Santo Domingo in the Dominican Republic on Tuesday afternoon and was moving northwest slowly at 7 mph. The system should turn north on Tuesday and continue in that direction through Wednesday. Franklin was expected to reach the southern coast of Hispaniola on Wednesday and then move off the northern coast on Thursday.

Tropical Storm Franklin was moving at about 7 mph on Tuesday and was expected to bring heavy rainfall across portions of Puerto Rico and Hispaniola into Thursday.
Tropical Storm Franklin was moving at about 7 mph on Tuesday and was expected to bring heavy rainfall across portions of Puerto Rico and Hispaniola into Thursday. [ The National Hurricane Center ]

Elsewhere in the tropics, Tropical Depression Gert became Post-Tropical Cyclone Gert on Tuesday after hours of hanging on by thread. Forecasters said the remnants of Gert should slowly dissipate.

Forecasters are also watching two other systems in the Atlantic.

One in the eastern Atlantic was producing disorganized showers and thunderstorms and could become a tropical depression by later this week as it moves west-northwest across the eastern Atlantic. The system as a 10% chance of formation in two days and a 40% chance in the next week.

In the central Atlantic, the remnants of Tropical Storm Emily were hundreds of miles east-northeast of the Leeward Islands. Forecasters said conditions could become more favorable for re-development later this week. The system has a 10% chance of formation in two days and a 30% chance of formation in the next week.

While none of these systems are currently predicted to move over Florida, the busy tropics serve as a reminder to prepare for the remainder of the hurricane season. The peak of the season, when most tropical activity occurs, is mid-August through mid-October.

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