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Apollo 11 astronauts returning to launch pad 50 years later

This March 30, 1969 photo made available by NASA shows the crew of the Apollo 11, from left, Neil Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, module pilot; Edwin E. “Buzz” Aldrin, lunar module pilot. Apollo 11 was the first manned mission to the surface of the moon. (Associated Press)
This March 30, 1969 photo made available by NASA shows the crew of the Apollo 11, from left, Neil Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, module pilot; Edwin E. “Buzz” Aldrin, lunar module pilot. Apollo 11 was the first manned mission to the surface of the moon. (Associated Press)
Published Jul. 16

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — Apollo 11's astronauts are returning to the exact spot from where they flew to the moon 50 years ago.

NASA has invited Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins to Kennedy Space Center's Launch Complex 39A on Tuesday. They will mark the precise moment — 9:32 a.m. on July 16, 1969 — that their Saturn V rocket departed on humanity's first moon landing. Mission commander Neil Armstrong — who took the first lunar footsteps — died in 2012.

RELATED: Florida remembers Apollo 11: 'How brave the astronauts were, how bold our country was, how small our world became'

It kicks off eight days of golden anniversary celebrations for each day of Apollo 11's voyage.

Also Tuesday morning, 5,000 model rockets are set to launch simultaneously at the U.S. Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville, Alabama. At the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, Armstrong's newly restored spacesuit goes on display.

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