Advertisement
  1. Nation & World

As Epstein bail fight looms, feds say evidence growing daily

FILE - In this July 30, 2008, file photo, Jeffrey Epstein, center, appears in court in West Palm Beach, Fla. Federal prosecutors, preparing for a bail fight Monday, July 15, 2019, say evidence against Epstein is growing “stronger by the day” after several more women contacted them in recent days to say he abused them when they were underage. (Associated Press)
Published Jul. 15

NEW YORK — Federal prosecutors, preparing for a bail fight Monday, say evidence against financier Jeffrey Epstein is growing "stronger by the day" after several more women contacted them in recent days to say he abused them when they were underage..

Prosecutors say Epstein, 66, is a flight risk and danger to the community and should remain incarcerated until he is tried on charges that he recruited and abused dozens of underage girls in New York and Florida in the early 2000s.

His lawyers counter that their client has not committed crimes since pleading guilty to soliciting a minor for prostitution charges in Florida in 2008 and that the federal government is reneging on a 12-year-old deal not to prosecute him. They say he should be allowed to await trial under house arrest in his $77 million Manhattan mansion, with electronic monitoring.

In a written submission Friday to U.S. District Judge Richard M. Berman, prosecutors revealed new information about their investigation and why they perceive Epstein as dangerous.

They said several additional women in multiple jurisdictions had identified themselves to the government, claiming Epstein abused them when they were minors. Also, dozens of individuals have called the government to report information about Epstein and the charges he faces, prosecutors said.

RELATED: Labor Secretary Alexander Acosta resigns amid Jeffrey Epstein deal scrutiny

Prosecutors said they believe Epstein might have tried to influence witnesses after discovering that he had paid a total of $350,000 to two individuals, including a former employee, in the last year. That came after the Miami Herald reported the circumstances of his state court conviction in 2008, which led to a 13-month jail term and his deal to avoid federal prosecution .

"This course of action, and in particular its timing, suggests the defendant was attempting to further influence co-conspirators who might provide information against him in light of the recently re-emerging allegations," prosecutors said.

The decade-old secret plea deal led to Labor Secretary Alexander Acosta's resignation last week. Acosta came under renewed criticism following Epstein's arrest over the 2008 non-prosecution agreement he oversaw as the U.S. attorney in Miami.

In addition to the charges in the indictment, prosecutors are also reviewing dozens of electronic files seized during a raid on Epstein's residence after his July 6 arrest, finding even more photos than the hundreds or thousands of pictures of nude and seminude young women and girls they had reported prior to a court hearing a week ago.

In their submission to the judge, Epstein's lawyers say their client has had a clean record since he began registering as a sex offender after his Florida conviction.

They said the accusations against Epstein are "outside the margins of federal criminal law" and don't constitute sex trafficking since there were no allegations he "trafficked anybody for commercial profit; that he forced, coerced, defrauded, or enslaved anybody."

Prosecutors said efforts by defense lawyers to characterize Epstein's crimes as "simple prostitution" were "not only offensive but also utterly irrelevant given that federal law does not recognize the concept of a child prostitute — there are only trafficking victims — because a child cannot legally consent to being exploited."

ALSO IN THIS SECTION

  1. Protesting union members prevent cars from driving into the General Motors Flint Assembly Plant on Bristol Road as United Automobile Workers remain on strike against GM on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2019, in Flint, Mich. GM and the union are faced with weakening vehicle sales, a deteriorating global economy and an unpredictable trade war.  (Sara Faraj/MLive.com/The Flint Journal via AP) SARA FARAJ | MLIVE.COM  |  AP
    More than 49,000 workers walked off their jobs on Monday in a dispute over the union’s quest to get a bigger share of GM’s profits.
  2. FILE - In this Sept. 22, 2010 file photo Ed Buck makes a campaign appearance for Meg Whitman, not shown, then a Republican candidate for governor of California, in Los Angeles. The prominent California Democratic donor, Buck, has been charged Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2019, with running a drug house where two men died of overdoses. Prosecutors allege Buck provided the meth that killed two men who were found in his apartment in 2017 and this January. DAMIAN DOVARGANES  |  AP
    Edward Buck, who was arrested at his home Tuesday, should be held on $4 million bail.
  3. Vehicles splash through heavy water filling Chimney Rock, south of Brays Bayou in Houston, Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2019. Officials in the Houston area were preparing high-water vehicles and staging rescue boats Tuesday as Tropical Storm Imelda moved in from the Gulf of Mexico, threatening to dump up to 18 inches of rain in parts of Southeast Texas and southwestern Louisiana over the next few days. MARK MULLIGAN  |  AP
    The main threat from Imelda remained the potential for heavy rainfall and flooding.
  4. A speedboat of the Iran's Revolutionary Guard moves around a British-flagged oil tanker Stena Impero, which was seized on Friday by the Guard, in the Iranian port of Bandar Abbas. The assault on the beating heart of Saudi Arabia’s vast oil empire follows a new and dangerous pattern that’s emerged across the Persian Gulf this summer of precise attacks that leave few obvious clues of who launched them. (Hasan Shirvani/Mizan News Agency via AP, File) HASAN SHIRVANI  |  AP
    Iran’s president and foreign minister also may skip next week’s high-level meetings at the United Nations.
  5. Pages from a confidential whistleblower's report obtained by The Associated Press, along with two printed Facebook pages that were active on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2019, are photographed in Washington. Facebook likes to say that its automated systems remove the vast majority of prohibited content glorifying the Islamic State group and al-Qaida before it’s reported. But a whistleblower’s complaint shows that Facebook itself has inadvertently produced dozens of pages in their names. (AP Photo/Jon Elswick) JON ELSWICK  |  AP
    A whistleblower’s complaint shows that the company has inadvertently provided the two extremist groups with a networking and recruitment tool.
  6. Corey Lewandowski, former campaign manager for President Donald Trump, testifies to the House Judiciary Committee, Tuesday on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin) JACQUELYN MARTIN  |  AP
    As President Donald Trump cheered along, his former campaign manager stonewalled many of the House Judiciary Committee’s questions.
  7. Workers refuel the tank at a gas station in Jiddah, Saudi Arabia, Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2019. U.S. President Donald Trump declared Monday that it "looks" like Iran was behind the explosive attack on Saudi Arabian oil facilities. He stressed that military retaliation was not yet on the table in response to the strike against a key U.S. Mideast ally. AMR NABIL  |  AP
    Even before Tuesday’s reversal in prices, economists downplayed the prospect that the price spike could send the economy reeling.
  8. Snowden published his book, “Permanent Record,” without submitting it for a pre-publication review, in violation of non-disclosure agreements he signed with both the NSA and the Central Intelligence Agency, the Justice Department alleges. Image by Archive
    Snowden published his book, “Permanent Record,” without submitting it for a pre-publication review.
  9. In this April 19, 2017, file photo, Cokie Roberts speaks during the opening ceremony for Museum of the American Revolution in Philadelphia. Roberts, a longtime political reporter and analyst at ABC News and NPR has died, ABC announced Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2019.  She was 75. MATT ROURKE  |  AP
    She died Tuesday in Washington of complications from breast cancer.
  10. Energy-efficient LED light bulbs. (Times | 2008) St. Petersburg Times
    Trump’s administration recently scrapped a rule that would have phased out incandescent light bulbs.
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement