Advertisement
  1. Bizarre News

Fifth-grader thought she brought gummy candies to school, but they were laced with marijuana

File photo of gummy candies. (iStock)
Published Jan. 21, 2018

A 9-year-old student in New Mexico gave fellow students gummies - only to realize later they were not ordinary candies.

The candies had apparently been laced with tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, the chemical responsible for how marijuana affects the brain, and were being used by the student's parents as medical marijuana. Kristi Del Curto, dean of elementary students at Albuquerque School of Excellence, told the Albuquerque Journal the fifth-grader brought the box of gummies she found at home and shared with friends at the school cafeteria one morning.

"She thought she was sharing candy, and if you saw the picture on the box, it did look like candy," Del Curto told the paper.

The student later felt dizzy during class and was sent to the school nurse. After school officials determined the fifth-grader had eaten THC-laced gummies, students were asked over the school's public address system who else had the candies, the paper reported. Del Curto said five other students had gummies. Some did not seem to have been affected, and some others were "giggly," she said. The student who brought the candies felt ill after eating five.

Read more: California chain of medical marijuana clinics downsizing Florida operations

One student told KRQE News 13 she immediately realized they were not ordinary candies after she ate one and started feeling dizzy. Paramedics were later called to check on the students.

School officials informed parents of the incident, which happened a little more than a week ago, according to the school's Facebook page.

"We would like to remind all students and parents to be cautious about food/drink sharing ... and we would like our community to be alert with drugs and any edibles that may or could be in different formats," the school wrote. "We kindly ask our parents and community members not to talk explicitly about drugs/medicine when students are present."

Read more: Another medical marijuana dispensary opens in St. Petersburg

Twenty-nine states or territories, including the District of Columbia, Guam and Puerto Rico, allow the use of marijuana for medical purposes. New Mexico became the 12th state to allow medical cannabis in 2007.

Eight states and D.C. have legalized recreational use of marijuana, but New Mexico is not one of them.

Edibles, or food products laced with cannabis extract, have become a popular way to sell marijuana, and many are sold online, though interstate transport is illegal. In Colorado, for example, edibles accounted for 45 percent of all cannabis sales, according to a paper published in the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

Edibles come in different forms, such as candies, gummies, chocolates, baked goods and beverages. They are largely considered a safer way to consume marijuana because they do not pose the harmful risks of smoking, though little research is available on how effective edibles are compared with other methods of ingestion. Edible products also account for majority of hospital visits, likely because users who do not realize the delayed effects consume higher-than-recommended amounts, the paper says.

Del Curto told local media the gummies came in a box labeled "Incredibles." The company's website says it sells different flavors of THC gummy candies. Recreational ones contain 100 milligrams of THC while medicinal ones have 300 milligrams.

ALSO IN THIS SECTION

  1. This satellite image shows Hurricane Michael on Oct. 9, 2018, as it enters the Gulf of Mexico. It made landfall near Mexico Beach in the Panhandle as a Category 5 storm. Florida State University professor Wenyuan Fan said the storm probably created "stormquakes" offshore in the gulf, too. [Photo courtesy of the National Ocean and Atmospheric Administration]] NOAA
    Analysis of a decade of records shows hurricanes causing seismic activity on continental shelf
  2. Screenshot of Austin Davis from a Vice News documentary on Youtube. Vice News/Youtube
    The 20-year-old Keystone Heights resident has selective eating disorder believed to stem from childhood trauma.
  3. Leonardo Urena of Napa, Calif., reacts after learning his pumpkin weighed in at 2,175 lbs., a new California weight record on Monday, Oct. 14, 2019, in Half Moon Bay, Calif. BEN MARGOT  |  AP
    Leonardo Urena of Napa won $15,000 Monday when his pumpkin logged 2,175 pounds.
  4. Check tampabay.com for the latest breaking news and updates. TMCCARTY  |  times staff
    The Fort Myers woman stepped in front of the plane and was struck.
  5. Michael Psofimis is accused of molesting an 11-year-old girl. Pasco Sheriff's Office
    Deputies said the incident happened in September.
  6. A power boat appears to have run up on the jetty across from Demens Landing Park downtown. "BOYZELL HOSEY   |   TIMES"  |  BOYZELL HOSEY  |  Times
    Two people were hospitalized. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is investigating.
  7. Sara Barnes (left) was convicted of burning down the Senator (right), one of the world's oldest trees, while she smoked meth inside of it in early 2012. She was arrested again Friday on a charge of trafficking meth. Seminole County Sheriff/Associated Press
    Sara Barnes was sentenced to 30 months in prison for burning down the fifth-oldest tree in the world. She now faces a new charge of trafficking meth.
  8. After appearing in federal court, where cameras are not allowed, Ramon Christopher Blanchett emailed this photo of himself in a library at Hillsborough Community College, where he is a part-time student. Ramon Christopher Blanchett
    Ramon Christopher Blanchett pleaded guilty Tuesday to the theft of government funds.
  9. A deer stands by clothes after crashing into a shop in Cortina D'Ampezzo, Italy, Tuesday, Oct. 1, 2019. A dazed and confused deer has been trapped in a clothing store in the fashionable mountain resort of Cortina d'Ampezzo, on the Italian Dolomites, before been saved and freed. Local authorities said the deer, a four-five years-old big specimen, entered the shop, specialized in tirolese outfits, by mistake as the assistant was away. Authorities said It was necessary to isolate the whole Cortina's square to allow vets to catch the deer, anesthetize it and then bring him back into the wild. Ufficio Stampa Provincia di Belluno via AP
    The deer, estimated to be 4 or 5 years old, entered the shop, specialized in Tirolese outfits, while the assistant was away.
  10. Carson King, of Altoona, Iowa, center, waves to patients in the University of Iowa Stead Family Children's Hospital at the end of the first quarter of an NCAA college football game between Iowa and Middle Tennessee, Saturday, Sept. 28, 2019, in Iowa City, Iowa. King plans to donate more than $1 million to charity after his decision to display a hand-written sign before the Sept. 14 Iowa State-Iowa football game seeking money for beer prompted an overwhelming number of donations. CHARLIE NEIBERGALL  |  AP
    Things did not end well for a reporter who called out a man who is donating millions of dollars to a children’s hospital.
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement