Advertisement
  1. News
  2. /
  3. Breaking News

Tropical Storm Nicholas strengthens some, still unlikely to affect Florida

Multiple tropical disturbances have cropped up in Florida’s surrounding waters. Added thunderstorm coverage possible, but for now, the state is in the clear.
The National Hurricane Center has upgraded a system developing in the Gulf to Tropical Storm Nicholas. The storm is expected to pass over northeastern Mexico and southern Texas late Monday.
The National Hurricane Center has upgraded a system developing in the Gulf to Tropical Storm Nicholas. The storm is expected to pass over northeastern Mexico and southern Texas late Monday. [ National Hurricane Center ]
Published Sep. 12
Updated Sep. 13

The peak of hurricane season was Friday, and right on cue, a number of potential storms are brewing in the Atlantic.

As of Monday morning, the National Hurricane Center was monitoring four areas of tropical disturbance — three in the Atlantic and one in the Gulf of Mexico — but Floridians need not worry, according to Dustin Norman, a meteorologist for the National Weather Service.

“At most, you may see some added moisture in the air that may enhance shower and thunderstorm coverage over the next five or six days,” Norman said. “But that’s it.”

The system posing the most immediate threat to land is the one developing in the gulf, which upgraded to Tropical Storm Nicholas at 1 p.m. according to the National Hurricane Center.

Forecasters at the National Hurricane Center in Miami said Nicholas was strengthening on Monday morning, churning up top winds of 60 mph. It was traveling north-northwest at 14 mph on a forecast track to pass near the South Texas coast later Monday, then move onshore along the coast of south or central Texas by Monday evening.

A hurricane watch was issued from Port Aransas to Freeport, Texas. Much of the state’s coastline was under a tropical storm warning as the system was expected to bring heavy rain that could cause flash floods and urban flooding.

A disturbance in the northeast Atlantic is not expected to cross the ocean at all. The final two disturbances are located just off the west coast of Africa. Even as those systems were to develop and move east, Norman said Florida would not see them reach land for at least another 15 days.

“At this time, it doesn’t look like there’s any indication those will approach the U.S., but models can’t project that far out, so a lot could change,” Norman said. “It’s just kind of a ‘wait and see.’”

Hurricane season continues through Nov. 30.