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Florida absent from AARP list of top cities for those over 50

In a Livability Index the AARP released on Monday that takes a number of factors - housing, neighborhood, transportation, environment, health, engagement and opportunity -into account  to rank every neighborhood and city in the nation for those over 50, cities and neighborhoods in Florida were nowhere near the top. [SCOTT KEELER | Times (2010)]
In a Livability Index the AARP released on Monday that takes a number of factors - housing, neighborhood, transportation, environment, health, engagement and opportunity -into account to rank every neighborhood and city in the nation for those over 50, cities and neighborhoods in Florida were nowhere near the top. [SCOTT KEELER | Times (2010)]
Published Apr. 20, 2015

For decades, older Americans have abandoned their hometowns in the Great White North to head to warmer days in Florida for retirement.

But a new study by AARP suggests they are leaving behind some of the neighborhoods that are best suited for them.

The AARP released a Livability Index on Monday that takes a number of factors — housing, neighborhood, transportation, environment, health, engagement and opportunity — to rank every neighborhood and city in the nation for those over 50.

Cities and neighborhoods in Florida were nowhere near the top. In fact, southern states were largely absent from the top of the lists all together.

However, cities and neighborhoods in Wisconsin, Minnesota and the Dakotas dominated the lists.

Of the top 10 neighborhoods, five were in those states — with Mifflin West in Madison, Wis., taking the top spot.

As for cities, San Francisco, Boston, Seattle, Milwaukee and New York topped the large cities list (500,000 plus). Tampa didn't make the Top 10, though somehow Philadelphia did.

In medium-sized cities (100,000 to 500,000), Madison was tops followed by St. Paul, Minn., Sioux Falls, S.D., Rochester, Minn. and Minneapolis. Yep, no St. Petersburg.

The top 5 small cities also were all in Wisconsin, Minnesota and North Dakota. Sorry, Largo!

To create the index, AARP surveyed 4,500 Americans 50 and older to determine the aspects of community most important to them, then created seven categories and crunched a bunch of numbers to figure out which neighborhoods came out on top.

You can find out how your neighborhood and city rank here .