Advertisement
  1. Real Estate

Lennar taps into active-adult lifestyle with homes near Tampa Bay's second Crystal Lagoon

Lennar, the nation's largest homebuilder, is planning "active-adult" single-family homes and villas in the new Montage at SouthShore Bay in southern Hillsborough County. [Courtesy of Lennar]
Published Dec. 19, 2017

WIMUAMA — Americans are living longer and staying a lot more active than they used to. The nation's home-building industry is eager to capitalize on that trend.

Tampa-based Minto Communities has partnered with Jimmy Buffett on Margaritavilles in Daytona Beach and Hilton Head, S.C., "active-adult" communities where baby boomers can enjoy "days of endless adventure and nights of nonstop fun" inspired by Buffett's classic song.

Now Lennar, the nation's largest homebuilder, is planning its first Tampa Bay active-adult homes in a new development in southern Hillsborough County that will also feature the nation's second Crystal Lagoon.

The 855 villas and single family homes in Montage at SouthShore Bay will have floor plans designed for "aging in place," including open layouts and showers with built-in benches. But Lennar is also stressing SouthShore's amenities including trails, golf cart paths and what purportedly is the fastest WiFi connection available.

The prime attraction, though, may be the Crystal Lagoon, a six-acre, man-made lake where residents can swim, kayak or even use a small sailboat. There will also be a restaurant, swim-up bar and family beach.

"The amenities in SouthShore Bay fit the active adult lifestyle that Floridians are looking for, with a wide range of outdoor activities," said Mark Metheny, president of Lennar's Tampa division.

Housing designed for adults is nothing new but builders and developers see an enormous market for places that offer more than just shelter. The average U.S. life expectancy has increased from 68 years in 1950 to 79 years while the poverty rate for Americans 65 and older has dropped to about 10 percent.

That means baby boomers are apt to have more money and enjoy better health than their parents. As a result, many are choosing to live out their golden years in communities that offer plenty to do for like-minded adults.

In November, more than 300 prospective buyers camped out overnight to be among the first to place deposits on homes in Latitude Margaritaville in Daytona Beach. When built out, the community could have up to 6,900 homes in a tropical setting that includes speciality shops, venues for live music and restaurants serving cheeseburgers and other "signature Margaritaville-style" food.

RELATED COVERAGE: Does Tampa Bay have right latitude for a Margaritaville retirement community?

The first residents are expected to move in sometime next year and Minto, the developer, is scouting sites for other Margaritavilles. The Tampa Bay area meets many of the announced criteria — a coastal location, a major airport and access to good health care.

Lennar's active-adult homes in Montage at SouthShore Bay will start in the mid $200,000s. The single family homes will range from 1,683 to 2,775 square feet with the largest having three bedrooms and three-car garages. The one- and two-story villas will have one-car garages.

RELATED COVERAGE: Nation's first Crystal Lagoon to open in spring 2018 in Wesley Chapel

All of the homes will be close to the Crystal Lagoon, which will contain millions of gallons of clear purified water. The nation's first Crystal Lagoon is under construction in Epperson, a Pasco County community where Lennar is also building homes.

Contact Susan Taylor Martin at smartin@tampabay.com or (727) 893-8642. Follow @susanskate

ALSO IN THIS SECTION

  1. A company called Flock Safety is selling automatic license plate readers to neighborhood associations to cut down on crime, and Tampa neighborhood Paddock Oaks is one of their customers. Pictured is a Flock camera on Paddock Oaks Dr. | [Luis Santana | Times] LUIS SANTANA  |  Times
    Atlanta-based Flock Safety has provided 14 area communities with high-speed, high-definition cameras for surveillance.
  2. The number of single-family homes sold in the Tampa Bay area during August rose 2.8 percent when compared with the same month last year, according to a monthly report from Florida Realtors. (Times file photo)
    The midpoint price in the bay area rose to $250,000, which is still lower than the state and national median prices.
  3. Watermans Crossing apartments at 4515 N. Rome Avenue in Tampa. Westside Capital Group
    Jakub Hejl discovered the Tampa Bay area while studying at IMG Academy.
  4. For sale sign on a  Tampa Bay home. [SUSAN TAYLOR MARTIN | Times]
    It pays to shop around for the lowest rate, new study shows.
  5. The inside of the former American Baptist Church of Beatitudes, located at 801 28th Ave N, is seen on Wednesday, Sept. 11, 2019 in St. Petersburg. The church is being converted into a three-bedroom home.  ALLIE GOULDING  |  Times
    Three property owners seek approval to landmark their properties: a closed school, a former church and a house built by noted St. Petersburg architect William B. Harvard
  6. Rendering of proposed UPC Insurance headquarters and hotel in St. Petersburg. Alfonso Architects
    Project would include wider sidewalks, more trees and street lighting.
  7. 500 Harbour Island, on right. © C2 DESIGN GROUP INC  |  Jones Lang LaSalle
    The price is by far the most paid per unit for a Tampa Bay apartment community
  8. The Grove at Wesley Chapel Jones Lang LaSalle
    Tenants include Michael’s and T.J. Maxx
  9. The city's downtown waterfront including the under-construction pier area as seen from the balcony of a penthouse in ONE St. Petersburg. MARTHA ASENCIO-RHINE  |  Times
    Some condos in the new ONE St. Petersburg are being flipped at hefty profits.
  10. Birds are seen around and on the decaying Redington Long Pier on Wednesday. ALLIE GOULDING  |  Times
    The project would require a zoning change and might be the last chance to save the decaying pier.
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement