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Florida touts its civics education. How will it teach the Trump-inspired riot?

A roundup of Florida education news from around the state.
Violent protesters, loyal to President Donald Trump, storm the Capitol, Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2021, in Washington. It's been a stunning day as a number of lawmakers and then the mob of protesters tried to overturn America's presidential election, undercut the nation's democracy and keep Democrat Joe Biden from replacing Trump in the White House. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
Violent protesters, loyal to President Donald Trump, storm the Capitol, Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2021, in Washington. It's been a stunning day as a number of lawmakers and then the mob of protesters tried to overturn America's presidential election, undercut the nation's democracy and keep Democrat Joe Biden from replacing Trump in the White House. (AP Photo/John Minchillo) [ JOHN MINCHILLO | AP ]
Published Jan. 7

The riotous activity in Washington D.C. as Congress prepared to certify Joe Biden as the nation’s next president caught the world’s attention. It’s bound to become the topic of conversation in Florida’s schools, too, as students and teachers continue to return to their classes after break. But how? Read on for that and other Florida education news, including a major about face at the University of South Florida.

Teachers face a challenge as they discuss events with their students. They say they need to allow the discourse to take place, and teach the important context, without letting their political biases seep in. It’s a real life lesson they have to respond to in real time, Education Week reports.

A coach at a Duval County private school was suspended over his social media reactions to the mob activity. He wrote that he was “ready to see some white bodies drop,” WJXT reports.

Leaders across Tampa Bay urged USF officials to rethink plans to shutter they school’s undergraduate education programs. The university acquiesced after months of criticism.

Some schools are seeing worse coronavirus outbreaks than others. All four Okaloosa County high schools are in the state’s top six for cases, the Northwest Florida Daily News reports.

New development means more kids coming into schools. The Flagler County School Board is unhappy with a plan that would help a planned subdivision pay a fee as a way to deal with crowding concerns it would generate, Flagler Live reports.

Broward County teachers are being required to return to classrooms despite health concerns. Their union leaders asked the county’s legislative delegation to help them during a pre-session delegation meeting, WLRN reports.

More coronavirus response money is on its way. The outgoing administration has approved the distribution of $54 billion to schools across the nation, Florida Phoenix reports. Florida’s share will be about $3.1 billion.

Several Alachua County schools lost their after-school program this year because of funding concerns. They will restart the program after their grant was renewed, WCJB reports.

What’s the best way to provide school security? The Volusia County School Board is considering the creation of a district police force, the Daytona Beach News-Journal reports.

Bay County schools usually need about 500 substitute teachers daily. They’re only getting about 300, and that’s causing problems, WJHG reports.

Cleared. Prosecutors said former Sarasota County School Board member Eric Robinson won’t face any charges over allegations of criminal activity in election campaigns, Florida Politics reports. Robinson called the accusations a smear, and has suggested they helped derail his reelection bid.

From the police blotter ... A Hillsborough County teen was arrested on accusations of bringing a gun to school.

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