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Student loan repayments resume this fall. We want to hear from you.

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A sign outside the Supreme Court on Friday, June 30, 2023, refers to one of biggest issues the justices dealt with this year. A sharply divided court ruled 6-3 that the Biden administration overstepped its authority in trying to cancel or reduce student loan debts for millions of Americans.
A sign outside the Supreme Court on Friday, June 30, 2023, refers to one of biggest issues the justices dealt with this year. A sharply divided court ruled 6-3 that the Biden administration overstepped its authority in trying to cancel or reduce student loan debts for millions of Americans. [ MARIAM ZUHAIB | AP ]
Published July 19, 2023|Updated July 23, 2023

In October, more than 2.7 million Floridians will have to start paying off their student loan debt for the first time since mandatory repayments were paused in the spring of 2020.

As of March, Floridians owed $105 billion in federal student debt in total — about $39,000 per borrower, on average. That’s one of the highest debt burdens in the nation, but the number for most borrowers is much lower. About one in three owes less than $10,000, and more than half owe less than $20,000.

Related: The Supreme Court killed debt relief. Here’s what’s next for borrowers.

These numbers offer a glimpse into Florida’s student debt landscape, but they’re only part of the story. If you’re one of the 12% of Floridians who owe federal student debt, the Tampa Bay Times wants to hear from you.

Fill out the survey below to tell us your debt story. If you leave your name and contact information, we may include your response in a future article.

If you’d rather contact us directly, please email Times Staff Writer lan Hodgson at ihodgson@tampabay.com

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