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High school graduations begin today across Tampa Bay

Left to Right: Lakewood High School seniors Nadaesha Davis, Riafnor Salcedo, Jazmine Hannan, Jenjira Berry, and Aices Mallory, all 18 and all from St. Petersburg, pose for a picture prior to the school's commencement at Tropicana Field, St. Petersburg, 5/16/18. [SCOTT KEELER   |   Times]
Left to Right: Lakewood High School seniors Nadaesha Davis, Riafnor Salcedo, Jazmine Hannan, Jenjira Berry, and Aices Mallory, all 18 and all from St. Petersburg, pose for a picture prior to the school's commencement at Tropicana Field, St. Petersburg, 5/16/18. [SCOTT KEELER | Times]
Published May 16, 2018

Put on your gowns. Get in line. Cue Pomp and Circumstance .

Tampa Bay's high school graduation season begins in earnest today, with ceremonies for four schools planned at Tropicana Field in St. Petersburg. Lakewood High will go first at 8:30 a.m., followed by Osceola Fundamental High at 11:30 a.m., Seminole High at 2:30 p.m. and Countryside High at 5:30 p.m.

Nearly 1,500 students will graduate from those schools today, but that's only the beginning.

PHOTOS: High school graduations across Tampa Bay

Pinellas County graduations continue into early next week at Tropicana Field and a handful of other locations.

Starting Thursday, the Hillsborough County school system — the nation's eighth-largest — begins the week-long process of staging 36 graduations, all but a few of them at the Florida State Fairgrounds.

Next comes neighboring Pasco County, where students will walk in ceremonies spanning May 24 to 28, most of them at the University of South Florida's Sun Dome.

Hernando County public schools start their graduations that weekend as well, with some ceremonies extending into early June.

Private schools throughout the region are on a similar schedule. Some graduations will take place as early as this week with others occurring as late as early June.

READ MORE

RELATED: Meet the top public high school grads in Pinellas County for 2018

MORE EDUCATION COVERAGE: Tampa Bay area high schools finish strong in this year's 'U.S. News & World Report' rankings

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