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Florida woman sees ‘once in a lifetime’ bird in her backyard

On average, there are only three reported sightings of yellow cardinals annually.
Port St. Lucie resident Tracy Workman photographed this extremely rare yellow cardinal recently in her backyard. Some northern cardinals have a genetic mutation that turns their normally crimson feathers yellow. Spotting one is extremely rare.
Port St. Lucie resident Tracy Workman photographed this extremely rare yellow cardinal recently in her backyard. Some northern cardinals have a genetic mutation that turns their normally crimson feathers yellow. Spotting one is extremely rare. [ Photo courtesy of Tracy Workman ]
Published Oct. 16, 2019
Updated Oct. 16, 2019

GateHouse Florida

Some northern cardinals have a genetic mutation that turns their normally crimson feathers yellow. Spotting one is extremely rare.

When Tracy Workman glanced in her backyard on Oct. 3, she could hardly believe her eyes. But before the photography teacher was able to snap a photo, the bird was gone.

Port St. Lucie resident Tracy Workman photographed this extremely rare yellow cardinal recently in her backyard. Some northern cardinals have a genetic mutation that turns their normally crimson feathers yellow. Spotting one is extremely rare. [Photo courtesy of Tracy Workman]
Port St. Lucie resident Tracy Workman photographed this extremely rare yellow cardinal recently in her backyard. Some northern cardinals have a genetic mutation that turns their normally crimson feathers yellow. Spotting one is extremely rare. [Photo courtesy of Tracy Workman]

Thankfully, she got a second shot a few days later when the bird returned to her backyard.

After following it around for a few minutes, Workman was finally able to snap a few photos.

“Following a bird is, of course, not the best way to get pictures of it,” Workman told the Naples Daily News. “But at first, I didn’t believe I actually saw it. I was super excited.”

Port St. Lucie resident Tracy Workman photographed this extremely rare yellow cardinal recently in her backyard. Some northern cardinals have a genetic mutation that turns their normally crimson feathers yellow. Spotting one is extremely rare. [Photo courtesy of Tracy Workman]
Port St. Lucie resident Tracy Workman photographed this extremely rare yellow cardinal recently in her backyard. Some northern cardinals have a genetic mutation that turns their normally crimson feathers yellow. Spotting one is extremely rare. [Photo courtesy of Tracy Workman]

According to bird expert and Auburn University professor Geoffrey Hill, on average there are only three reported sightings of yellow cardinals annually, making Tracy Workman’s discovery truly special.

Read more here.