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At least seven Floridians are among Capitol arrest tally

Some are accused of violating a curfew that followed the riot. Others are alleged to have participated in the mayhem.
Lights from police vehicles illuminate Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington, following an insurrection at the U.S. Capitol. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)
Lights from police vehicles illuminate Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington, following an insurrection at the U.S. Capitol. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File) [ CAROLYN KASTER | AP ]
Published Jan. 15
Updated Jan. 28

The list of people who participated in last week’s riot at the U.S. Capitol is long. As the FBI continues to try to identify the hundreds of supporters of President Donald Trump who stormed the building, smashing windows, rampaging through offices and breaching the Senate floor, authorities have accused at least 72 people with crimes related to the siege and its aftermath.

Their criminal charges include entering or remaining in a restricted building without lawful entry, violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds, civil disorder, theft of government property and possession of a firearm on Capitol grounds.

At least seven Floridians are among those arrested so far. Here’s a look at who they are and the accusations against them.

Adam C. Johnson, 36, Parrish — One of the most recognizable faces to emerge from the riots, federal authorities say Johnson is the man seen in a photograph hoisting a lectern bearing the seal of the Speaker of the House of Representatives. Johnson, donning a knitted cap with the name “Trump,” smiles and waves in the image as he lugs the lectern through the Capitol Rotunda. Another photograph included in a federal criminal complaint depicts Johnson inside the Capitol posing beside a sign that reads “closed to all tours.”

Adam Christian Johnson, 36, is accused of being the pro-Trump protester seen carrying the lectern of U.S. Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi through the Rotunda of the U.S. Capitol Building after a pro-Trump mob stormed the building on Jan. 6. He was arrested Jan. 9 and held in the Pinellas County Jail.
Adam Christian Johnson, 36, is accused of being the pro-Trump protester seen carrying the lectern of U.S. Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi through the Rotunda of the U.S. Capitol Building after a pro-Trump mob stormed the building on Jan. 6. He was arrested Jan. 9 and held in the Pinellas County Jail. [ Pinellas County Sheriff's Office | Getty Images ]

An stay-at-home father of five boys, Johnson was arrested in Florida three days after the riot. Facing three charges, including theft of government property, he spent two days in the Pinellas County Jail before a federal judge allowed him to go free on bond.

Johnson wore a T-shirt, shorts and flip-flops as he walked out of federal court Monday in downtown Tampa with his lawyers, Dan Eckhart and David Bigney. Speaking with reporters on the courthouse steps, Eckhart acknowledged that the photo of his client carrying the lectern is problematic for the defense.

Related: Florida man accused in Capitol lectern theft allowed to go free on bond

“I don’t know how else to explain that, but yeah, that would be a problem,” Eckhart said. “I’m not a magician, and neither is Mr. Bigney. We’ve got a photograph of our client in what appears to be inside the federal building, inside the Capitol, with government property.”

Matthew R. Council, 49, Riverview — Council was reported to be part of a group that clashed with police in the Senate wing of the Capitol during the riot. A criminal complaint states that he continuously yelled at police as he and others pushed through an emergency door that was supposed to stay closed. Council pushed a police officer who tried to stop him from going further into the building, the complaint states. Police then subdued him with pepper spray.

After being arrested, Council “spontaneously expressed remorse” for hitting the officer and said he didn’t intend to injure her, the complaint states.

Council made his first appearance Thursday in federal court in Tampa. He was allowed to remain free on a signature bond, co-signed by his parents, while his case is pending.

Michael Curzio, 35, Summerfield — Curzio was among several people police arrested inside the Capitol after crowds breached the building Jan. 6. He and five others were near the front of a large crowd near the entrance to the House Atrium, according to a criminal complaint. The group refused police orders to leave, were placed in handcuffs and later given citations to appear in court.

Michael Curzio was served time in Florida's prison system for an attempted murder conviction.
Michael Curzio was served time in Florida's prison system for an attempted murder conviction. [ Florida Department of Corrections ]

Curzio previously spent six years in Florida’s prison system for an attempted murder conviction.

A Facebook profile in his name, which has since disappeared, posted four videos Jan. 6 from Washington, D.C.

“On our way back home, plus I got arrested yesterday,” read a post that appeared Jan. 7. “Our point was made yesterday, I have no regrets for anything.”

Curzio faces federal charges of entering or remaining in a restricted building and violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds. In his first court appearance Thursday, Curzio received the assistance of a public defender. A judge granted a prosecutor’s request that he be temporarily detained until a court can determine whether to release him on a bond.

Andrew Williams, 32, Maitland — Williams, a firefighter for the city of Sanford, near Orlando, was identified by FBI agents as the person seen in a set of photos and videos taken during the Capitol riots. One video depicts the rioters filing into the building while a voice is heard saying “We’re storming the capitol! Yeah, baby!” The camera then flips around to show Williams, according to the complaint.

In another video, the complaint states, Williams can be heard saying “Taking it back, baby,” “We are inside the Capitol,” and “How can they arrest every single person?” A still image also depicts Williams standing and pointing to an overheard sign that reads “Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi.”

A law enforcement officer in Sanford notified the FBI that the man in the images was Williams, the complaint states. He was arrested Tuesday on charges of unlawful entry and disorderly conduct. He was allowed to go free on bond while his case is pending.

The city of Sanford announced Williams had been placed on paid leave pending an investigation.

Related: Pro-Trump Largo coffee shop owner recounts moment barriers gave way at U.S. Capitol

Michael Amos, 38, Naples — A charging document from the Superior Court in Washington, D.C., states that Amos was among several people who were arrested near the Peace Monument, outside the Capitol building, a few hours after the riot. The document states that the group ignored police commands to disburse. They are accused of violating a curfew that Washington, D.C.’s mayor enacted following the riots.

Andrew B. Johnson, 39, Tampa — Johnson is listed as a co-defendant with Amos, having been part of the same group that was arrested near the Peace Monument, outside the Capitol building, a few hours after the riot.

John Anderson, St. Augustine — The U.S. Capitol Police reported that Anderson was among several people arrested Jan. 6 on a misdemeanor charge of unlawful entry. Further details in his case were not immediately available.

Related: Tampa Bay singer finds her voice screaming during Capitol riot

Times staff writer Josh Fiallo contributed to this report.

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Tampa Bay Times U.S. Capitol coverage

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EDITORIAL: The ugly spectacle perfectly captured the Trump-era GOP.

CLASSROOM TOPICS: Tampa Bay teachers, parents brace for tough conversations after U.S. Capitol siege

POLITIFACT FACT-CHECKS THE SIEGE: Here’s a look at the day’s short session, and the chaos that interrupted it.

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