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Voting groups sue Florida over DeSantis congressional map

The opponents say the map will diminish the state’s Black representation and benefit Republicans.
Rep. Yvonne Hayes Hinson, D-Gainesville voices her opposition to Senate Bill 2-C: Establishing the Congressional Districts of the State in the House of Representatives Thursday at the Capitol in Tallahassee. Moments later, the session was halted on a protest by Democrats, but continued after a brief recess. Voting rights groups sued Florida on Friday over a congressional map drawn by Gov. Ron DeSantis and passed by the GOP-controlled Legislature, saying it will diminish the state’s Black representation and benefit Republicans.
Rep. Yvonne Hayes Hinson, D-Gainesville voices her opposition to Senate Bill 2-C: Establishing the Congressional Districts of the State in the House of Representatives Thursday at the Capitol in Tallahassee. Moments later, the session was halted on a protest by Democrats, but continued after a brief recess. Voting rights groups sued Florida on Friday over a congressional map drawn by Gov. Ron DeSantis and passed by the GOP-controlled Legislature, saying it will diminish the state’s Black representation and benefit Republicans. [ PHIL SEARS | AP ]
Published Apr. 22|Updated Apr. 22

TALLAHASSEE — Voting rights groups sued Florida on Friday over a congressional map drawn by Gov. Ron DeSantis and passed by the GOP-controlled Legislature, saying it will diminish the state’s Black representation and benefit Republicans.

Florida lawmakers approved the map Thursday as part of a contentious three-day special legislative session during which Black and Democratic representatives staged a sit-in on the House floor, prayed and sang “We Shall Overcome” in protest.

Rep. Angie Nixon, D-Jacksonville, and Rep. Tray McCurdy, D-Orlando, sit on the Florida Seal in protest as the special session ends and other legislators leave the House of Representatives Thursday at the Capitol in Tallahassee.
Rep. Angie Nixon, D-Jacksonville, and Rep. Tray McCurdy, D-Orlando, sit on the Florida Seal in protest as the special session ends and other legislators leave the House of Representatives Thursday at the Capitol in Tallahassee. [ PHIL SEARS | AP ]

DeSantis signed the measure into law Friday.

The League of Women Voters of Florida, the Black Voters Matter Capacity Building Institute, Equal Ground Education Fund and others filed the suit in a state court in Tallahassee. The case alleges the new map violates provisions of the Florida Constitution that prohibit districts from diluting the electoral power of minorities and from being drawn to benefit one political party over another.

Related: DeSantis congressional map splits St. Petersburg, reduces Tampa Bay competition

“The League and the other plaintiffs have chosen to not stand by while a rogue governor and a complicit state Legislature make a mockery of Florida’s Constitution and try to silence the votes and voices of hundreds of thousands of Black voters,” Cecile Scoon, president of the League of Women Voters of Florida, said in a statement.

The lawsuit names as defendants Secretary of State Laurel M. Lee, Attorney General Ashley Moody and the Republican leaders of the House and Senate, among others. Their offices did not immediately return emails seeking comment.

Rep. Ramon Alexander, D-Tallahassee speaks during debate on Senate Bill 2-C: Establishing the Congressional Districts of the State in the House of Representatives Thursday at the Capitol in Tallahassee. At right is Rep. Matt Willhite, D-Wellington. The session was halted later due to a sit-down protest by a small group of Democrats, but it continued after a brief recess, and the bill passed.
Rep. Ramon Alexander, D-Tallahassee speaks during debate on Senate Bill 2-C: Establishing the Congressional Districts of the State in the House of Representatives Thursday at the Capitol in Tallahassee. At right is Rep. Matt Willhite, D-Wellington. The session was halted later due to a sit-down protest by a small group of Democrats, but it continued after a brief recess, and the bill passed. [ PHIL SEARS | AP ]

DeSantis took the unusual step of vetoing the map drawn by the Legislature earlier this year and proposing his own, calling lawmakers back into the special session to approve it. Democrats say the map strongly favors the GOP and dismantles two traditionally Black districts.

The governor’s office drew up a map it described as neutral on race and party affiliation, and which it said abided by both the state and federal constitutions. But even supporters have acknowledged that it is likely to draw legal challenges.

The Florida congressional delegation now has 16 Republicans and 11 Democrats, and the state is poised to gain one U.S. House seat based on the results of the 2020 U.S. census. Many political observers have said the DeSantis map could give Republicans a 20-8 advantage, though Florida’s vast number of unaffiliated voters can swing elections. Such an advantage would help DeSantis, should he run for and win the White House in 2024.

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Rep. Yvonne Hayes Hinson, D-Gainesville, Rep. Daisy Morales, D-Orlando, Rep. Tray McCurdy, D-Orlando (in front) and Rep. Angie Nixon, D-Jacksonville, protest on the Florida Seal as debate is halted on Senate Bill 2-C: Establishing the Congressional Districts of the State in the House of Representatives Thursday at the Capitol in Tallahassee. The session was halted during the protest, but continued after a brief recess.
Rep. Yvonne Hayes Hinson, D-Gainesville, Rep. Daisy Morales, D-Orlando, Rep. Tray McCurdy, D-Orlando (in front) and Rep. Angie Nixon, D-Jacksonville, protest on the Florida Seal as debate is halted on Senate Bill 2-C: Establishing the Congressional Districts of the State in the House of Representatives Thursday at the Capitol in Tallahassee. The session was halted during the protest, but continued after a brief recess. [ PHIL SEARS | AP ]

Of Florida’s 14.3 million registered voters, about 36 percent are Republicans and 35 percent Democrats, while the overwhelming majority of the remainder have no party affiliation.

Black Floridians currently serve in five of the state’s 27 districts, representing about 19 percent of the delegation. Four of them are Democrats; one of them is a Republican in an overwhelmingly white constituency. Black people represent about 16 percent of Florida’s population.

Previous maps had included a long, slim district spanning northern Florida that would have largely kept intact the constituency of Black Democratic Rep. Al Lawson. DeSantis has singled out that district, saying it violated guidelines for compactness.

By BRENDAN FARRINGTON, Associated Press.

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