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YouTube video from inside Pasco schools removed

Families and school leaders had complained that the video posed security and privacy risks.
Viewers who went to see Emma and Ellie's YouTube video of their school open house tours encountered a new message Thursday morning, as the items were gone from the site.
Viewers who went to see Emma and Ellie's YouTube video of their school open house tours encountered a new message Thursday morning, as the items were gone from the site. [ YouTube ]
Published Aug. 29, 2019

All the attention paid lately to a YouTuber’s video tour of two Pasco County schools looks to have had an unexpected side effect.

The 14-minute recording from inside Mitchell High School was no longer available on the site just before midnight Wednesday — the same day the Tampa Bay Times published a story detailing the safety and privacy concerns of school officials, parents and students who had been touched somehow by the recording.

RELATED: YouTubers with 1.1 million followers create security, privacy concerns for Pasco schools

“I believe the perpetrators took down the Mitchell video,” said civic activist Heide Janshon, who was among those filing a complaint with the school district.

The DeLucio family, which had posted the material to its YouTube channel of more than 1 million subscribers, did not respond to requests for comment. School principal Jessica Schultz had said, though, that the family previously refused to take down the video even after being presented with her view that the school’s safety might be compromised.

In the past, the DeLucios said on their channel that their children had been kicked out of a private school over their unwillingness to remove a video the school objected to.

It has been estimated that, based on the channel’s viewership, it could generate about $270 a day from the ads that run on the videos. That’s just under $100,000 a year.

The two daughters also have their own individual channels, with teenager Emma boasting another 1 million-plus subscribers.

School district officials said they had no role in the disappearance of the video, which they did not know about until asked. They said they will continue to work on policy revisions to ensure the district has adequate rules to prevent parents and visitors from recording non-public activities in the schools without advance permission.

The district already has rules and policies in place governing employees and students.

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