Advertisement
  1. News
  2. /
  3. Gradebook

Pasco School Board member Colleen Beaudoin to seek second term

Beaudoin has been an outspoken board member on issues ranging from teaching time to transgender student rights.
Pasco County School Board member Colleen Beaudoin [Jeffrey S. Solochek | Times] [JEFFREY SOLOCHEK]
Pasco County School Board member Colleen Beaudoin [Jeffrey S. Solochek | Times] [JEFFREY SOLOCHEK]
Published Oct. 9
Updated Oct. 9

Colleen Beaudoin, first elected to the Pasco County School Board in 2016, filed papers Tuesday to pursue another four-year term in office.

Currently the board’s vice chairwoman, Beaudoin won her post initially without opposition. She is so far the only candidate for the District 2 seat, which represents much of central Pasco, after a potential challenger withdrew from the race just days after submitting candidate documents with the elections office.

A University of Tampa math instructor, who previously taught in Hillsborough County schools, Beaudoin has become a vocal advocate for both teachers and students during her tenure on the board.

Related: <b>RELATED: </b> New School Board member Colleen Beaudoin ready to dig into issues

She has been a staunch supporter of transgender student rights in the face of conservative appeals for the board to dismantle some of its protections for children who seek to use locker rooms and restrooms according to their gender identity. She also has worked with the district to ensure that teachers can use all available instructional time, and backed a course grading model that eliminates variables such as behavior from achievement.

Beaudoin joined the rest of the board to oppose having teachers volunteer as armed school guardians, saying flatly that teachers should not have guns. She proved a swing vote in the board rejections of district proposals to shut down Lacoochee, Hudson and Mittye P. Locke elementary schools.

She has pressed the district administration to tackle issues relating to excessive student absenteeism, amid conversations over whether students should be able to make up missed work from unexcused absences. And she’s regularly called on the district to prioritize teacher salary increases, although she has not supported any spending cuts to reallocate funds.

“I’m proud of the work we’ve done,” Beaudoin said, citing such accomplishments as expanding Cambridge and IB programs, better publicizing choice offerings to families and identifying more students for advanced academics. “There’s still more I want to do.”

Those included further increasing academic program options, maximizing teaching time and minimizing testing, and providing more early learning classes.

“It’s been a tremendous experience,” said Beaudoin, who first ran after becoming active at Pine View Middle School, where her son attended. “I never dreamed I would have this opportunity.”

The District 2 seat is not the only one up for election in 2020.

The District 4 seat, currently held by chairwoman Allison Crumbley, also comes open. Crumbley, a frequent ally of Beaudoin’s on the board, has signaled that she intends to run again. She first won a two-year partial term in 2010, and has been reelected since.

The superintendent’s job is up, too. Incumbent Kurt Browning, in office since 2012, has said he will announce his plans later in the year.

Browning has attracted criticism over the years for some of his actions, ranging from challenged school boundary revisions to recommending closures of several schools, sparking questions of whether he will draw any opposition.

So far, no one has filed papers to pursue either the District 4 seat or the superintendent’s office.

ALSO IN THIS SECTION

  1. Pasco School District headquarters in Land O' Lakes
    The sides have not set a new date for negotiations.
  2. Tony Pirotta, right, meets with his Armwood High Ought to be a Law student club and state Rep. Susan Valdes to talk strategy for the group's latest legislative proposal. They presented their bill to state senators on Dec. 9. [JEFFREY SOLOCHEK  |  Times Staff Writer]
    A roundup of stories from around the state.
  3. Florida's Baker Act was written in 1971 by Maxine Baker, a 65-year-old grandmother and a freshman Florida legislator from Miami-Dade County, seen here in a 1965 photo. [Associated Press]
    The law was written in 1971 by Maxine Baker, then a freshman legislator from Miami-Dade County who pushed for the rights of people with mental illness.
  4. Sarah Henderson with her son, Braden, who was committed under the Baker Act after a joking remark at school. [JOHN PENDYGRAFT  |  Tampa Bay Times]
    A cop car comes. A child is handcuffed and taken to a mental health facility. The scene is all too frequent at public schools across the state.
  5. Three Armwood High School students testify before the Senate Education Committee on Dec. 9, 2019. Left to right are seniors Maria Medina, Haley Manigold and Madison Harvey. [Emily L. Mahoney | Times]
    “The people who are cynics about politics are also the ones who complain the most,” said one student, who said democracy requires participation.
  6. Sen. Rob Bradley, R-Fleming Island.
    The idea is part of Florida leaders’ pitch to address low teacher pay, though there is still disagreement over how to do so.
  7. The government program provides free lunches in schools that qualify, regardless of a student's family income. The idea is to erase a stigma.
    One manager lost her job, accused of taking advantage of the program she oversaw.
  8. Sally Henderson, a Hillsborough County teacher, is one of the few Florida educators to earn National Board certification since 2015.
    The state still has more teachers in the program than all states except North Carolina.
  9. Staci Plonsky holds art from son A.J., who has autism, that depicts his memory of being taken by the school resource officer to a mental health facility under Florida's Baker Act law. [JOHN PENDYGRAFT  |  Tampa Bay Times]
    A roundup of stories from around the state.
  10. Chanell Newell, a reading teacher at Woodson K-8 School, is a finalist for Hillsborough Teacher of the Year. [HCPS  |  HCPS]
    The winners will be announced on Jan. 23.
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement