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Six more coronavirus deaths reported in the Tampa Bay region

There are more than 1,200 confirmed COVID-19 cases reported in the four-county Tampa Bay area.

The number of Florida deaths related to the novel coronavirus continues to climb, with 27 new deaths reported Wednesday. More than a fifth of the new deaths came from the greater Tampa Bay area, including in Pinellas and Citrus counties.

The state said it had 15,698 confirmed cases of the coronavirus, an increase of more than 950 from a day prior. The number of deaths stands at 323.

That includes three new deaths in Citrus County: a 74-year-old woman, an 84-year-old man and an 88-year-old man.

It also includes the death of a 56-year-old woman from Pinellas County, a 77-year-old woman from Polk County and an 81-year-old man from Manatee County.

There are more than 1,200 confirmed cases of the coronavirus in Tampa Bay, an increase of more than 40 cases in this area from 24 hours earlier.

Fifty-seven of the known cases are in Hernando County, while Hillsborough County has 631 cases, Pinellas has 395 and Pasco has 127.

In Polk County, there have been 206 confirmed cases, while Manatee County has 172 known cases and Citrus has 55.

How fast is the number of Florida COVID-19 cases growing?

Morning updates typically show low numbers for the current day.

Even these higher numbers are likely not the entirety of the coronavirus cases in the Sunshine State. Some people who are infected may not be getting tested, including some who may be asymptomatic.

The case numbers are expected to continue rising in the near future as testing continues to expand and as the virus’ spread continues in communities.

Yet experts have said that social distancing measures are likely helping slow the spread of the virus and will keep numbers from shooting even higher in the near future.

The University of Washington’s Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, one of several organizations projecting the trajectory of the coronavirus in the United States, earlier this week said it revised its forecast for Florida. It said it expects the state’s epidemic to peak earlier than originally expected and that the number of deaths may not be as high as originally forecast.

So far, 143,707 people in Florida have been tested for the coronavirus, with nearly 11 percent testing positive. Another 1,457 people are waiting for test results.

In Tampa Bay, 9,652 people in Hillsborough have been tested, 7,409 in Pinellas, 808 in Hernando and 2,809 in Pasco.

Statewide, 2,082 people have been hospitalized at some point because of the virus.

What are the latest numbers on coronavirus in Tampa Bay?

The state’s case tracking includes residents and visitors diagnosed in Florida as well as a small number of Floridians who were tested and isolated elsewhere.

Among Floridians, 475 residents or staff of long-term care facilities have tested positive for the coronavirus as of Wednesday. That number is up 25 percent from Tuesday.

Florida coronavirus cases by age group

Doctors say older people are at a greater risk to developing severe symptoms from COVID-19, which makes Florida especially vulnerable.

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