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‘Little bit sad:’ Fanless U.S. Open begins Monday

The tennis major will begin as scheduled, albeit without spectators, and with one player dropped from the field because he tested positive for the coronavirus.
In this Monday, Aug. 24, 2020, file photo, Arantxa Rus right, returns a shot from Serena Williams during a match at the fanless Western & Southern Open in New York at the Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, site of the U.S. Open. Spectators also were banned from attending the Grand Slam tournament. It is one of several measures meant to protect players and others on-site from getting — or spreading — the coronavirus.
In this Monday, Aug. 24, 2020, file photo, Arantxa Rus right, returns a shot from Serena Williams during a match at the fanless Western & Southern Open in New York at the Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, site of the U.S. Open. Spectators also were banned from attending the Grand Slam tournament. It is one of several measures meant to protect players and others on-site from getting — or spreading — the coronavirus. [ FRANK FRANKLIN II | AP ]
Published Aug. 31, 2020

NEW YORK — In April, an on-schedule U.S. Open did not seem possible.

The coronavirus was at its peak in New York; a building on the tournament grounds housing indoor tennis courts was converted to a field hospital.

The pandemic was locking down much of society, including sports. Wimbledon was canceled for the first time in 75 years, the French Open was postponed, and the U.S. Tennis Association said it was considering changing its dates for the U.S. Open.

Today, the last day of August, the 2020 U.S. Open will begin as scheduled, albeit without spectators, and with one player dropped from the field because he tested positive for the coronavirus.

Benoit Paire, a Frenchman who was seeded 17th, was replaced in the draw Sunday, a striking reminder of the circumstances surrounding this attempt to ensure that the Grand Slam show goes on.

There are many other reminders, such as the plastic signs propped up around the quieter-than-usual grounds, making a mix of requests and commands.

“Keep us all safe. Please wear a mask & keep your distance.”

“Unless you are eating, please wear your mask in the dining area.”

“We’re Back! But hugging isn’t. Some ways to say hello: virtual hugs; quick elbow taps. Please avoid: hugs; fist bumps.”

“Help us keep the bubble safe. Let us know if you witness unhealthy behavior,” with a phone number to call.

Merchandise shops are filled with empty shelves and undressed mannequins. Instead of a main plaza filled with fans eating, drinking, comparing purchases and talking about tennis, there is a space for players to hang out, with a putting green, basketball hoop and giant chess board among the outdoor diversions offered.

“When you’re walking to and from practice — you have to get somewhere for a certain time — it’s nice. You know that there’s no one around, that you’re not going to get stopped,” said Andy Murray, who won the first of his three Grand Slam titles at Flushing Meadows in 2012. “Yeah, it’s very quiet and very relaxed.”

Then Murray described his thoughts during his trek to the locker room after a practice session last week.

“I was like, ’Wow, this is pretty sad, because usually this place is just filled with energy and atmosphere, like before the tournament starts,” he said. “Now it’s tennis players and their teams walking around with masks on. It’s just all very different and a little bit sad.”

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When play begins this morning in Arthur Ashe Stadium — where many seats are covered by pieces of cloth with messages such as “New York Tough” and “Black Lives Matter” — 2016 runnerup Karolina Pliskova, the top-seeded woman, will play Anhelina Kalinina in the opening match.

That distinction was not earned by virtue of Pliskova being ranked No. 1, but because the women who hold the first two WTA spots, Ash Barty and Simona Halep, chose not to participate because of the pandemic. Pliskova has never won a Grand Slam singles title.

The No. 2 seed is Sofia Kenin, who won the Australian Open, the only major completed this year to date.

Serena Williams, No. 9 in the world, is seeded third as she pursues a record-tying 24th Grand Slam singles title. Williams, who will be 39 on Sept. 26, lost in last year’s final to Bianca Andreescu, who also isn’t playing this year. In all, six of the top eight women are missing.

On the men’s side, missing are Rafael Nadal, last year’s champion, who didn’t want to travel, and Roger Federer, who ended his season after two knee operations.

The overwhelming favorite for the men’s championship is top-ranked Novak Djokovic.

“I always love playing in New York. I think I’m not the only one who shares the opinion that this is probably the most exciting, energetic, dynamic, explosive tennis court that we have in the sport,” Djokovic said. “It is strange to see empty stands.”

Djokovic has won five of the past seven Grand Slam trophies to raise his total to 17, three shy of Federer’s record for men, two behind Nadal.

“You can sense that around the site there is a certain tension … because everyone is obviously being careful,” Djokovic said, “but at the same time, everyone needs to pay attention and follow the protocols and restrictions that are in place.”

U.S. Open

Today-Sept. 13, Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, New York

2019 champions: Rafael Nadal; Bianca Andreescu. Neither are playing this year. Nadal cited coronavirus concerns; Andreescu cited “unforeseen challenges, including the Covid pandemic.”

Other notable absences: Roger Federer (knee surgery); No. 1 Ash Barty (coronavirus concerns)

Top seeds: Novak Djokovic; Karolina Pliskova

Top matches Monday: No. 1 Karolina Pliskova vs. Anhelina Kalinina; No. 4 Naomi Osaka vs. Misaki Doi; No. 14 Anett Kontaveit vs. Danielle Collins; No. 31 Anastasija Sevastova vs. Coco Gauff; No. 1 Novak Djokovic vs. Damir Dzumhur.

TV Monday: noon, ESPN; 6 p.m., ESPN2

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