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Average U.S. virus cases dip below 100,000 for first time in months

The seven-day rolling average of new infections was well above 200,000 for much of December and went to roughly 250,000 in January.
The Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine is delivered to a patient in Mecca, Calif. Scientists say it's still too early to predict the future of the coronavirus, but many doubt it will ever go away entirely.
The Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine is delivered to a patient in Mecca, Calif. Scientists say it's still too early to predict the future of the coronavirus, but many doubt it will ever go away entirely. [ JAE C. HONG | AP ]
Published Feb. 14
Updated Feb. 14

ATLANTA — Average daily new coronavirus cases in the United States dipped below 100,000 in recent days for the first time in months, but experts cautioned Sunday that infections remain high and precautions to slow the pandemic must remain in place.

The seven-day rolling average of new infections was well above 200,000 for much of December and went to roughly 250,000 in January, according to data kept by Johns Hopkins University, as the pandemic came roaring back after it had been tamed in some places over the summer.

That average dropped below 100,000 on Friday for the first time since Nov. 4. It stayed below 100,000 on Saturday.

“We are still at about 100,000 cases a day. We are still at around 1,500 to 3,500 deaths per day. The cases are more than two-and-a-half-fold times what we saw over the summer,” Dr. Rochelle Walensky, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said on NBC’s “Meet the Press.” “It’s encouraging to see these trends coming down, but they’re coming down from an extraordinarily high place.”

She added that new variants, including one first detected in the United Kingdom that appears to be more transmissible and has already been recorded in more than 30 states, will likely lead to more cases and more deaths.

“All of it is really wraps up into we can’t let our guard down,” she said. “We have to continue wearing masks. We have to continue with our current mitigation measures. And we have to continue getting vaccinated as soon as that vaccine is available to us.”

The U.S. has recorded more than 27.5 million virus cases and more than 484,000 deaths, according to the Johns Hopkins data.

With parents and political leaders eager to have children around the country back in school for in-person learning, it is important that people continue to observe precautions, Walensky said.

“We need to all take responsibility to decrease that community spread, including mask wearing so that we can get our kids and our society back,” she said.

The CDC released guidance on Friday outlining mitigation strategies necessary to reopen schools or to keep them open.

- Sudhin Thanawala and Kate Brumback

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