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All Children's Hospital, UnitedHealthcare resolve contract dispute that affected thousands

Johns Hopkins All Children's Hospital and UnitedHealthcare have agreed to rates, ending a stalemate that left United members paying out-of-network fees. [JIM DAMASKE | Times]
Published Jun. 9, 2017

ST. PETERSBURG — UnitedHealthcare members can once again pay in-network rates at Johns Hopkins All Children's Hospital, the hospital and the insurance company announced Thursday.

All Children's had been out of network since May, when contract negotiations between United and the hospital broke down. All Children's wanted United to pay more; United said All Children's was asking for too much.

Stalemate between All Children's Hospital, UnitedHealthcare leaves families in a bind

The two sides have now reached consensus on rates, All Children's president Dr. Jonathan Ellen said, adding that he was "not at liberty" to disclose details. They still have to hammer out some fine points, and a final agreement isn't expected until July 1. But United members can pay in-network rates immediately.

"The voice of the families mattered," Ellen said. "UnitedHealthcare heard them and we heard them, and that pushed us all forward."

The agreement affects thousands of families across the Tampa Bay area. United covers some of the region's largest private employers and local governments, including Pinellas County government, the cities of St. Petersburg and Tampa, and Raymond James.

Contact Kathleen McGrory at kmcgrory@tampabay.com or (727) 893-8330. Follow @kmcgrory.

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